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2017 Legacy News and Rumors


dgoodhue

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Many of those systems would work on stick just as well as automatic, they mostly control brakes, throttle, and steering. I can see what you are saying with the slowing down while the gear is still engaged but there are ways around that...dual clutch anyone?
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Well I know that a fraction of legacy's sold were manual so killing it off is just following the trend of many manufactures. However I know that there are people like me who would not buy a new Legacy if it was only available in an automatic. From a profit standpoint it wouldn't make sense but to keep customers happy it would.

 

A car manufacturer would need to justify the expense of diverging their assembly line to install a different option with enough demand to recoup those costs. If only 5% of their sales for a car consists of manual transmissions (I have no idea what the actual numbers are, I'm not in the automotive industry), then that's debatable. It's probably even more unlikely if half of those purchasing manuals (like me) would still buy some type of automagic transmission if the rest of the car was solid.

 

I didn't buy my Legacy because it was a manual. I bought it because it was AWD, spacious enough for a family, and could move in a hurry.

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The main reason for the manual being dead isn't emissions related, it's because the automatic gearboxes have caught up in fuel economy. It's only the last decade or so that the AT fuel economy for real life driving have approached the economy of a manual gearbox, something that is the key factor for selling vehicles in Europe where the fuel prices are about 3 times the prices in the US.
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Turbo-less is fine but this trend, this horrible horrible trend of no MT is the pits. Its like the only MT car I can buy is a 6MT accord lol.

 

The BR looks great it would look even better with a MT option they make them for CAN whats the harm in retaining a few for the good old USA :lol: Yes the CVT/AT boom has caught up in term of MPG but the MT is cheaper to produce, repair and integrate into the baseline(no VDC, TCU, interfaces with the ECM) And lastly this is Subaru not Honda, Toyota, Mazada arent we known for being somewhat "niche" :eek:?

 

At least Porsche came out and said the 7MT is here until at least 2025 so maybe i need to buy that 911 991

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The main reason for the manual being dead isn't emissions related, it's because the automatic gearboxes have caught up in fuel economy. It's only the last decade or so that the AT fuel economy for real life driving have approached the economy of a manual gearbox, something that is the key factor for selling vehicles in Europe where the fuel prices are about 3 times the prices in the US.

 

Lamborghini begs to differ...

 

"Unfortunately I must say yes," he told us. "All the systems that are integrated in the car need to have a dialog with one another. The clutch is one of the fuses of the system, whether you're engaging or disengaging the torque. This creates a hole in the communication between what the engine is able to provide and how the car reacts to the power of the engine. For this reason, unfortunately, I must say I am sure that in a premium supersports car like [the Huracán], we will only do a semiautomatic."

 

he does not specifically say emissions but it is the ultimate reason for wanting 100% computer control over every aspect of the car's performance

 

Road and Track points out

 

By 2016, all new cars will be required to average 35.5 MPG. Those that don’t will cost the companies that make ’em money – in the form of “gas guzzler” fines. And that will cost you money, as these fines are folded into the price tag of cars that don’t quite make the cut.

 

oops

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By 2016, all new cars will be required to average 35.5 MPG. Those that don’t will cost the companies that make ’em money – in the form of “gas guzzler” fines. And that will cost you money, as these fines are folded into the price tag of cars that don’t quite make the cut.

 

That just sounds ridiculous. I seriously can't stand the big fuss about mpg. I myself have never cared about the gas mileage a vehicle gets and never will. If I like the vehicle then I buy it. The mpg is what it is/part of the price you pay to drive. In general I really hate where we are headed with the future of cars. :spin:

Alex D.

JDM Prestige Motors

alex@jdmprestigemotors.com

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As far as I can see it was changed to 34.1 mpg average for 2016. They are using a more optimistic highway mpg calculation and their are credits manufacturer can gain, so it isn't the window sticker mpg that needs to be averaged. In torquenews, I read that Subaru already met those numbers as of 2015 model year.
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That just sounds ridiculous. I seriously can't stand the big fuss about mpg. I myself have never cared about the gas mileage a vehicle gets and never will. If I like the vehicle then I buy it. The mpg is what it is/part of the price you pay to drive. In general I really hate where we are headed with the future of cars. :spin:

 

I care. My truck averages 13mpg, but I only average 1000 miles/year so I don't care too much. At my last job, I was driving 25K miles per year. When gas is $4/gallon that is $275 month when I am average 30mpg in my Subaru. In my truck, that would have been $650/month in gas.

 

It also is technically in our country's best interest to reduce our dependence on oil (less demand equals lower oil prices, plus it keep more money in the US economy)

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What car companies don't tell you is that 34 or 35 mpg mandate is the average fuel efficiency rating. Over a company's entire line of vehicle models being sold in the US the combined estimated rating must meet the mandate, not every individual vehicle. This is why so many companies have come out with fume sniffing compacts and hybrids. Look on the other end and they higher powered gas gulping models. As long as they average out to meet the mandate .gov is happy.
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Salesman at the dealer goes, "Hey nice legacy. I'm told they are bringing them back with a 2.4 liter turbo."

 

 

I was told the same thing today when I picked my wagon from having the air bag recall done.

 

Now if they just make the Lapis Blue with black interior...

305,600miles 5/2012 ej257 short block, 8/2011 installed VF52 turbo, @20.8psi, 280whp, 300ftlbs. (SOLD).  CHECK your oil, these cars use it.

 

Engine Build - Click Here

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I got the two letters about the airbag recall today, for 05 LGT and 05 OB. So CT dealers have parts? Got to call Valenti to schedule the replacement. Will talk to couple of sales guys there that seems to be enthusiast friendly.

 

May hear some news about Tribeca 2, yes our youngest is 4YO and my MIL stays with us for long periods of time so need a car bigger then current OB.

 

Interesting that nothing came out as far as prototypes to warrant new turbo wagon. Where is B4 to shatter our wet dreams?

2005 LGT Wagon Limited 6 MT RBP Stage 2 - 244K

2007 B9 Tribeca Limited DGM - 243K

SOLD - 2005 OB Limited 5 MT Silver - 245K

SOLD - 2010 OB 6 MT Silver - 205K

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I wouldn't be surprised if it's a 1.6 liter turbo engine similar to the one in the Levorg. And even though it's a nice engine for a daily driver it's definitely not that much fun. The performance of that engine is similar to the diesel I have.
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I've heard no indication that the 3.6l is going away. I have asked what engine may be put in the unnamed 7 passenger sport ute and was told likely the 3.6l or a "new" engine. No details were given. I was left with the feeling that the lid is screwed on to that jar pretty tightly.
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I've heard no indication that the 3.6l is going away. I have asked what engine may be put in the unnamed 7 passenger sport ute and was told likely the 3.6l or a "new" engine. No details were given. I was left with the feeling that the lid is screwed on to that jar pretty tightly.

 

Competition is getting better and better too. Subaru's perceived mistake with Tribeca B9 was that the 3.0H6 was too weak for that big of a vehicle, that's why they bumped it up to 3.6 and made premium fuel NOT required for 2007+ refresh.

 

I doubt Subaru will repeat the same mistake with turbo H4, unless they go crazy about the average fleet fuel consumption figures.

2005 LGT Wagon Limited 6 MT RBP Stage 2 - 244K

2007 B9 Tribeca Limited DGM - 243K

SOLD - 2005 OB Limited 5 MT Silver - 245K

SOLD - 2010 OB 6 MT Silver - 205K

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Competition is getting better and better too. Subaru's perceived mistake with Tribeca B9 was that the 3.0H6 was too weak for that big of a vehicle, that's why they bumped it up to 3.6 and made premium fuel NOT required for 2007+ refresh.

 

I doubt Subaru will repeat the same mistake with turbo H4, unless they go crazy about the average fleet fuel consumption figures.

 

Different issue. Downsizing 6 cylinders into direct injected turbo 4 cylinders is an industry trend. It helps with fuel economy and emissions. Subaru is behind the times by using a 6 instead of of a turbo 4 as it is in the Legacy and Outback. The 2.0 DIT makes more horsepower and torque than the 3.6R and has a meatier powerband as well. I'd imagine something bigger than that would be on tap for a Tribeca replacement.

 

The Ford Explorer, new Volvo XC-90, and New Mazda CX-9 all use 4 cylinder turbos.

[sIGPIC][/sIGPIC]

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I doubt Subaru will repeat the same mistake with turbo H4, unless they go crazy about the average fleet fuel consumption figures.

 

Just realize that the fuel consumption figures are legal requirements so there's not much to do about it.

 

I think that in the future most cars will have 4 cylinder and 3 cylinder engines, possibly teamed up with hybrid technology just to be able to cope with the requirements on fuel consumption in the future.

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I am pretty sure that if they brought the GT back, I could convince the wife that my 12’ GT was missing something that the new model cures. Otherwise I will keep my car for quite a while, unless we need a truck more than I currently think we do.

 

A good sized 7 passenger SUV in the neighborhood of the Lamda platform size would pretty much be a guaranteed buy for my wife as it is time to replace the 07 Odyssey.

 

The only short coming I have with Subaru, the crappy dealership in Chattanooga. Dealing with them is almost bad enough to make me want to sell my GT now...

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