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2nd Gen Engine FAQ - Turbos - MPG - Engine Builds - Engine Swaps - Engine Management


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General Engine FAQ

 

This thread applies to the second generation Legacy. The BD, BG, and BK.

 

Table of Contents :

 

1. Turbo FAQ

2. MPG FAQ

3. N/A Engine Swap FAQ

4. Engine Management FAQ

5. Hybrid / Frankenmotor FAQs

6. Tuning FAQ

Edited by broknindarkagain

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TURBO FAQ

 

I've seen and answered countless questions about turbo charging the second generation Subaru Legacy. I'm putting together this FAQ to help clear up some of these questions.

 

If I have missed anything, please feel free to suggest something for me to add to this FAQ. I will edit it as I see fit.

 

Wiring Harness Merge - HOW TO

 

Can I turbo charge my Legacy?

Short answer is no, you can not. However, keep reading and I will explain ways that you are able to have boost in your car.

Why can't I turbo charge my car?

I can go on for days explaining this. However I'll try to keep it short and to the point. The EJ25D is an open deck engine. It is NOT a strong engine and does not handle boost well. There have been people who have been able to run about 4 - 5psi on them though. This is typical for a TD04 turbo, and to be honest isn't enough power for the money you will spend doing it. You also run into other problems like weak internals and compression ratio. The EJ22E is a little bit of a stronger engine and can handle about 10psi, however the money thing comes into play here as well. You can do a swap for just a little more then it will cost you to boost your EJ22E and have considerably more power.

What about the JDM second generation Legacys? They are twin turbo!

Unlike our USDM Legacys, the JDM Subaru Legacy has an engine designed to withstand the extra power of the turbos. The EJ20R has forged internals, and VERY good heads...

I've seen Legacys online that have a turbo. How did they do it?

Most people do some kind of WRX or STI swap. This includes just about all of the WRX / STI guts. Engine, transmission, rear diff, ecu, wiring, subframe, etc. I'll go into more details later on.

What other options do I have besides a WRX or STI swap?

There are a few other options out there. Most of the JDM drivetrains can be bought on Ebay for a reasonable price. Personally, I'm running an EJ20R setup with a stand alone ECU. You can also use the older USDM Turbo Legacy engines.

What about my transmission?

The 4EAT and the 5MT are not strong transmissions. They do excellent under stock horsepower, but when you start adding the power of forced induction to them...they don't last for very long. They may work for a little while, but they will have severe problems A LOT sooner then then should.

So if my transmission isn't strong enough, what should I do?

The easiest thing to do is to find a wrecked donor car. Or you can find a transmission / rear diff combo online. I'm currently running a JDM STI v3 5 speed with a stage 1 clutch. Its good up until about 400awhp.

What about my exhaust? I've installed a turbo engine and I can't make the exhaust fit around the subframe. It looks like I have to cut part of it out!

Our stock subframes were not designed to accomadate for the turbo exhaust. The work around for this is to either use an 04 STI or any 02-07 WRX subframe. DO NOT cut your stock subframe. It will not be as strong as it needs to be if you do this. You can also run any of the USDM turbo Legacy subframes.

So can you just give me a quick list of the parts I need to do a turbo swap?

This depends on what route you go. If you do a WRX / STI swap, you will need the following

 

  • Engine

  • Transmission

  • ECU

  • Wiring

  • Rear Diff

  • Turbo

  • Exhaust

  • Subframe

  • Custom Driveshaft

 

If you do some kind of JDM swap, you will need all the same stuff listed, except you will not be able to run a stock ECU. With a JDM swap, your best bet is a stand alone ecu system like AEM or Megasquirt. Piggyback systems are an option, but are more trouble then its worth.

So I did a JDM swap with a stand alone ECU, but my car doesn't run right. What do I do?

You need to get your car dyno tuned at this point. Every ECU has parameters and settings for the engine to run within. With any kind of stand alone ECU, you have to "tune" these settings to your specific setup. Its not hard to do, its just hard to get it right. If you screw up when you do it, it will cost you your engine. If you really did a swap and didn't know the answer to this, you should probably build model cars instead.

I want to do a swap, but I'm concerned about my stock axles. Will they be able to handle the extra power of a turbo engine?

You should be fine within reason. You're not going to be able to put 500awhp to stock axles, but the 200awhp area is fine on stock Legacy axles. A decent upgrade is STI or WRX axles. They are able to handle a little more abuse then the Legacy parts.

I want the EJ20R twin turbo JDM engine in my car! It will bolt right up....right?

Wrong. Its VERY difficult to run the twin turbo setup on our USDM Legacys. The reason for this is the difference between right and left hand drive. Our steering linkage, brake booster, etc gets in the way of the second turbo. I have seen a USDM Impreza run the twin turbo EJ20R, but they had to heavily modify it. My personal EJ20R has been converted to a single rotated turbo. I HIGHLY recommend the EJ20R because its an excellent engine, but expect to NOT have a twin turbo system with it.

So whats the hardest part about doing a turbo swap?

The wiring in our cars is a nightmare. If you do a WRX / STI swap with the WRX / STI ECU, you have to "splice" the stock Legacy wiring harness, and the WRX harness together. If you run a stand alone ECU, you will have to make a custom wiring harness. Trust me, there are A LOT of wires.

I chose to do a WRX / STI swap, but I want a little more power out of the stock WRX / STI drivetrain. What can I do?

Before you start upgrading the stock WRX / STI setup, you should look into some kind of piggyback system like a CobbAP. This way, you're able to tune your car to whatever mods you have installed and get all the power out of it. After a piggyback, you can do a rotated turbo setup with something bigger then the TD04 or VF39. Bigger injectors, exhaust, MSD, boost controller, etc are all good upgrades.

I always look on my local Craigslist classifieds for a wrecked WRX / STI, but I never see one. Where can I find one at?

The best places to look are local Subaru forums, NASIOC, and car auctions.

I want to use X block with X heads for my turbo build. Can I do this?

YES! This is whats known as a "hybrid" build. Usually, you can pair any EJ series head with any EJ series engine. I would recommend using ARP head studs if you plan on running a lot of boost.

I'm going to install a WRX engine, but I want to use the STI 6 speed transmission. Is this possible?

Yes it is. Just like the heads, you can mix-match engines/transmissions. Transmission mounts may be different for each transmission however. The STI 6 speed has the DCCD that will need to be wired in though, and I'm not sure how to do it...but I do know that it has been done on our cars.

Can I use my stock Legacy clutch?

Probably. I would suggest otherwise though. It will likely shatter on launch or slip under power.

What about gas mileage after a turbo swap?

Your gas mileage will suffer some. I know our cars are not the most fuel efficient cars on the road already....but any time you add more power to a vehicle, it gets worse gas mileage. My Legacy turbo isn't THAT bad on gas. The worst part of is is that I have to run 93 octane.

What else do you suggest?

I suggest some suspension and brake work to be done with your swap. If you're anything like I am, you take advantage of the AWD system and haul *ss through the corners. Now that you have more power under the hood, you're going to be able to come into these corners a lot faster. Better suspension and better brakes are a MUST. I have WRX brakes and D2 Racing coilovers. I'm pretty happy with the suspension, however I am wanting to upgrade the brakes even more so then they already are.

What is your current turbo setup?

I have a 1995 Subaru Legacy L. It has the JDM EJ20R engine in it paired with the JDM STI v3 5 speed and a limited slip rear diff. I have a Megasquirt stand alone ecu, port/polished heads, 252 cams, upgraded fuel pump, MSD, 660 injectors, front mount intercooler, rotated TD04, full 3 inch turbo-back exhaust, etc. I'm happy with my current setup, but its only good up until about 400awhp.

There isn't much space under my hood. Are you sure all this turbo stuff will fit?

Yes it will fit

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v287/broknindarkagain/LegacySTI/199555_10150150413543326_605068325_6516934_7951161_n.jpg

 

Mechanically, you can bolt up any EJ series engine to any EJ series transmission, and drop the two into any car that was designed with any EJ series engine.

 

The exception to this EJ series engine rule is the EJ20R (JDM twin turbo). This mechanically would bolt up, but it was never available in the united states, and therefore the way the turbos are routed makes it impossible to install and have it clear the steering rack on a left hand drive car.

 

This is true, however you can use the EJ20R on left hand drive Subarus if you convert it to a single turbo setup. This will require using any stock or aftermarket WRX exhaust. The twin turbo setup does not fit around our left hand drive steering rack and linkage. It can be made to work with heavy custom modifications though, but doesn't seem to be worth the trouble.

 

 

The following is a list of Subaru EJ Turbo Charged engines that are able to fit into the second generation Legacy / Outback / Impreza

 

2.0L Single Turbo

-
EJ20G
JDM 93-96 STI, WRX 92-96

-
EJ20K
JDM 97-99 STI

-
EJ205
JDM 99-01 WRX Wagon, 01-11 WRX, USDM 02-05 WRX

-
EJ207
JDM 98-11 STI

2.0L Twin Turbo must be converted to single turbo

-
EJ20H
JDM 93-98 Legacy

-
EJ20R
JDM 96-98 Legacy

-
EJ206
JDM 98-03 Legacy

-
EJ208
JDM 98-03 Legacy

2.2L Single Turbo

-
EJ22T
USDM 90-94 Legacy

-
EJ22G
JDM Impreza STI GC8

2.5L Single Turbo

-
EJ255
USDM 06-11 Impreza, 04-11 Forester, 03-11 Legacy, 04-06 Baja

-
EJ257
USDM 04-11 STI

 

- If you turbo your existing engine, it'll probably break.

 

- If you turbo your existing engine, it'll probably be slow.

 

- If you plan on doing a full swap, just buy a rolled STi. The end result will be much cleaner, much more reliable, much more durable, and much faster than any piecemeal hodgepodge you put together otherwise. If you REALLY want to have a turbo second-gen that you could actually consider marginally reliable, this is pretty much the best way to go.

 

- If you DO plan on doing a WRX swap (EJ20 from a USDM donor), set aside funds to replace the EJ20 short block. Stock EJ20 heads on a stock STi shortblock with an 18G is a simple recipe for TONS of torque and lots of fun.

 

- If you are going to do it, don't skimp. You'll regret every corner you cut when the car breaks down.

 

 

EDIT :

 

If you're needing the FSM - look here http://www.sl-i.net/FORUM/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=20753

 

A good read about swaps http://www.modified.com/tech/0403scc_subaru_gbd_wrx_engine/index.html

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

COME AND TAKE IT

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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MPG FAQ

 

This thread is intended to be a consolidated source of information about gas mileage in our cars.

 

If you have any questions pertaining to MPG, please post them in this thread.

 

Please keep one thing in mind. You do not drive a 3 cylinder Geo Metro. You're NEVER going to get 35+ MPG. On a well running Second Generation Legacy, you can expect up to mid 20s

 

Things to replace

 

  • Spark Plugs
     
  • Spark Plug Wires

    Faulty plugs and wires can affect your MPG by 10%


  • Air Filter

    A dirty air filter can affect your MPG by about 5%. They are usually less then $10, so just replace it with a new one. A dirty one basically "chokes" your engine.


  • Fuel Filter

    Same deal as the air filter, but a little more expensive....usually around $20


  • Upstream O2 Sensor (before cat converter)

    The only O2 sensor that affects your MPG is the upstream sensor before the converter (closest one to the engine). With age and use, they tend to wear out and not function as good as a new one. Replacing an old O2 sensor can sometimes help out your MPG. DO NOT use a "universal" one.


  • Engine Oil

    For fuel economy, its best to run lower viscosity oils. I personally run Mobile 1 Synthetic 5w30. Heavier oils put more resistance inside the engine, directly affecting fuel economy.


  • Transmission Filter / Fluid

    For automatic transmissions, dirty fluid or worn out fluid can cause the transmission to work harder.


  • Rear Diff Fluid

    Clean GL5 has less resistance, and allows the gears to spin more freely.


  • Pulleys

    Replacing your stock crank pulley with a lighweight (not undersize) pulley will help you out a bit.


  • Flywheel

    For 5 speed cars, installing a lightweight flywheel will help out. It reduces rotating mass on the engine. Basically does the same thing as a lightweight crank pulley, but on a much bigger scale.


  • Coilpack

    Replacing your stock ignition with MSD will burn your fuel better, resulting in better MPG


 

 

Things to clean

 

  • Mass Air Flow Sensor

    If this is dirty or not functioning correctly, your air / fuel mixtures will not be right. This will cause a drop in fuel economy.


  • Idle Air Control Valve
     
  • Throttle Body

    Cleaning the throttle body will give the air coming into your engine a more direct path without resistance.


  • Fuel Injectors

    Run a bottle or two of STP Fuel Injector Cleaner. Clean fuel injectors work MUCH better.


  • Trash / Excess Luggage In Your Car

    All the extra weight in your car affects your gas mileage. The more weight is on the wheels, the harder the engine has to work to get the car moving....and keep it moving


 

 

MISC

 

  • Alignment

    If your car is out of alignment, there is more rolling resistance on the tires, causing the engine to work harder to move the car. If your alignment is out in the rear, its almost like your back tires are pulled, instead of rolling straight.


  • Tire Pressure

    Higher tire pressures have less rolling resistance. I wouldn't go above 35PSI though.


  • Wheel Bearings

    A bad wheel bearing will cause the same kind of problems as low tire pressure.


  • Brakes

    Brakes that "stick" and don't release like they should cause the engine to work harder to start rolling the tires.


  • Cruise Control

    Use your cruise control. When you drive at a steady speed, you use less gas.


  • Lead Foot

    Its been said that your fuel economy drastically drops after 55MPH. Don't drive like a bat out of hell.


  • Route Selection

    What roads you travel on have a big impact on your gas mileage. Try choosing straight, flat roads instead of hills and curves. As well, the more "stop and go" traffic you're in, the more gas you will use.


  • Check Engine Light

    Is your check engine light on? If so, its going to directly have an impact on your fuel economy. Get whatever is wrong fixed, and you will see an increase in fuel economy.


Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

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"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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NON-TURBO ENGINE SWAP FAQ

 

Here is a list of non-turbo engines that can be fitted to any BD, BG, or BK Legacy. If an older non-OBDII engine is used, some modifications must be made for OBDII sensors.

 

EJ15

Used in Impreza GC1 series
Specifications

  • Displacement: 1493 cc

  • Bore: 85.0 mm

  • Stroke: 65.8 mm

  • Compression Ratio: 9.4:1 - 10.0

  • Valvetrain: SOHC

  • Fuel Delivery multi point fuel injection

EJ151

Horsepower: 97 PS (71 kW; 96 bhp) @ 6000 rpm

Torque: 129.4 N•m (95 lb•ft) @ 3600 rpm

EJ152

Horsepower: 102 PS (75 kW; 101 bhp) @ 5600 rpm

Torque: 136.3 N•m (101 lb•ft) @ 4000 rpm

EJ153

Horsepower: 95 PS (70 kW; 94 bhp) @ 5200 rpm

Torque: 140.2 N•m (103 lb•ft) @ 3600 rpm

EJ154

Horsepower: 100 PS (74 kW; 99 bhp) @ 5200 rpm

Torque: 142.0 N•m (105 lb•ft) @ 4000 rpm

EJ16

Usage:

Impreza 93-94 (JDM only) GC4 series

Impreza 93-06 (Europe & Middle East)

Impreza 93-97 (Australia)
Specifications

  • Displacement: 1597 cc

  • Bore: 87.9 mm

  • Stroke: 65.8 mm

  • Compression Ratio: 9.4:1 - 10.0:1

  • Valvetrain: SOHC

  • Fuel Delivery mpfi (carburetor in some locations)

Horsepower: 100 PS (74 kW; 99 bhp) @ 6000 rpm

Torque: 138.3 N•m (102 lb•ft) @ 4500 rpm
EJ18

Usage:

Impreza 93-99 GC6 series

Legacy (except USA) 90-96 BC2, BC3, BD2, BD3, BG3 series

Isuzu Aska (1990–1993)
Specifications

  • Displacement: 1820 cc

  • Bore: 87.9 mm

  • Stroke: 75.0 mm

  • Compression Ratio: 9.5:1 - 9.7:1

  • Valvetrain: SOHC

  • Fuel Delivery: single point fuel injection

EJ181

Horsepower: 110 PS (81 kW; 108 bhp) @ 6000 rpm

Torque: 149.1 N•m (110 lb•ft) @ 3200 rpm

EJ182

Horsepower: 115 PS (85 kW; 113 bhp) @ 6000 rpm

Torque: 154.0 N•m (114 lb•ft) @ 4500 rpm

EJ183

Horsepower: 120 PS (88 kW; 118 bhp) @ 5600 rpm

Torque: 163.8 N•m (121 lb•ft) @ 3600 rpm
EJ20

Specifications

 

  • Displacement: 1994 cc

  • Bore: 92.0 mm

  • Stroke: 75.0 mm

EJ20D DOHC
1989 - 1999 Legacy JDM

150 hp (110 kW) BC - BF and BD - BG series

EJ20E SOHC

Legacy JDM
1989-1994 125 hp (93 kW) BC - BF series

1993-1999 135 hp (101 kW) BD - BG series

1998-2004 155 hp (116 kW) BE - BH series

2003-2009 140 hp (100 kW) BL - BP series

Impreza JDM

1993-1999 135 hp (101 kW) GC - GF series

2008-current 140 hp (100 kW) GH series

Isuzu Aska (1990–1993)

1989-1994 125 hp (93 kW)

EJ202 SOHC

2002 - 2008 Forester JDM SG series

EJ204 DOHC AVCS

Legacy JDM BL - BP series
2003-2009 190 hp (140 kW)

Impreza JDM GC - GF series

1993-1999 155 hp (116 kW)

EJ20N runs on compressed natural gas

EJ22

Usage

 

  • 1995 - 2001 Impreza

  • 1990 - 1999 Legacy

  • 1995 - 1999 Outback

Specifications
Displacement: 2212 cc

Bore: 96.9 mm

Stroke: 75.0 mm

Compression Ratio: 9.5:1 - 9.7:1

Valvetrain: SOHC

Fuel Delivery: multi-point fuel injection

 

EJ221

Horsepower: 135 PS (99 kW; 133 bhp) @ 5800 rpm

Torque: 186.3 N•m (137 lb•ft) @ 4800 rpm

EJ222

Horsepower: 142 bhp (106 kW; 144 PS) @ 5600 rpm

Torque: 149 lb•ft (202 N•m) @ 3600 rpm

EJ22E

Horesepower: 135bhp (101kW) @ 5800 rpm

Torque: 140 ft•lbf (190 N•m) @ 4800 rpm

EJ25

Usage

 

  • 1998 Impreza

  • 1998 Forester

  • 1996 - 2004 Legacy

  • 1996 - 1999 Outback

  • 2000 - 2004 Impreza 2.5RS & 2.5TS

  • 2002 - 2004 Impreza Outback Sport

  • 2000 - 2004 Forester

  • 2003 - 2005 Baja

Specifications

 

  • Displacement: 2457 cc

  • Bore: 99.5 mm

  • Stroke: 79.0 mm

  • Compression Ratio: 9.5:1 - 10.0:1

  • Fuel Delivery: multi point fuel injection

EJ25D

1996:

Horsepower: 155hp (116kW) @ 5600 rpm

Torque: 140 ft•lbf (190 N•m) at 2800 rpm

1996 - 1999

Horsepower: 165 hp (123 kW) @ 5600 rpm

Torque: 162 ft•lbf (220 N•m) at 4000 rpm

EJ251

Horsepower: 165hp (123kW) @ 5600RPM

Torque: 167 ft•lbf (226 N•m) @ 4000RPM

EJ252

Horsepower: 156hp (115kW)

EJ253

Horsepower: 173 hp (129 kW) @ 5600 rpm

Torque: 166 ft•lbf (225 N•m) @ 4000 rpm

EJ254

Horsepower: 165 (2006+ is 175hp)

 

information from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subaru_EJ_engine

Edited by broknindarkagain

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"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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ENGINE MANAGEMENT FAQ

 

I am NOT a professional with engine management. I know some about it, but there are gaps in what I do know. If someone finds something that I'm missing, please let me know and I'll add it in.

 

DISCLAIMER : It is a violation of federal law (and possibly State law depending what state you're in) to tamper with vehicle emissions equipment unless the vehicle is for use on private property and closed courses only. It is not legal to operate a vehicle on public roads if it has a modified emission system. - United States law. I don't know about other countries.

 

When do I need engine management?

I believe
every
car can benefit from engine management. Out of the factory, your car is "tuned" to run as efficiently and clean as possible (thank you EPA). Unfortunately, when you aim to make a car efficient...you sacrifice some power.

 

So what are my options? Am I able to reflash my stock ECU?

You are not able to flash your stock ECU. There are two options that one can choose from

 

Piggy Back ECU

This is the cheaper and easier option. Most piggy back systems will give you good control over engine functions. Most people who want engine management will go this route for its ease and price.

 

Stand Alone

This is the higher end option. This is not for amateurs however. Stand alone systems give you complete 100% control of your vehicles functions. As well, there are tons of goodies like flat shifting, anti-rev (aka traction control), launch control, nitrous control, etc. Stand alone systems sometimes require a 100% custom made wiring harness and sensors that are specific to whatever stand alone you're using.

 

I have an automatic car, but I want engine management. Is this possible?

Yes it is, however your only option is a piggy back system. You will still need your stock ECU to control the transmission, and you won't be able to do that with a stand alone.

 

So I got my engine management and installed it, but my car doesn't start or runs poorly

You need to get it "tuned". Read the tuning FAQ in the post below this one.

 

 

I have copied this from NASIOC. Its specific to the WRX / STI, however most people who do swaps in our cars will be using a WRX / STI swap. A lot of the information crosses over to other engines as well.

 

NOTE

Any mention of "open source tuning" aka RomRaider or the likes does not apply unless you run a WRX or STI ECU. If you plan on running a stock Legacy ECU, open source tuning will NOT work.

 

 

Engine Management FAQ

 

Why do I need engine management? Consider your stock engine management for just a moment. Your stock engine control unit (ECU) is a very complex piece of circuitry that calculates hundreds of variables every second. All of these variables rely on inputs within a + or – range. When you modify your vehicle, these values change. As long as the changes are within the values the ECU expects to receive, your engine runs fine. Once the values are exceeded, the ECU is programmed to compensate to return the values to normal levels.

 

This is a layman’s explanation of how your stock ECU can actually work against you when modifying your vehicle. This also explains why modifications can feel great once they are bolted on but the butt dyno results seem to fade over time. This is due to ECU compensation.

 

What is the first step in finding what engine management I need? Finding a tuner. The Tuner FAQ will help with the general rules of finding a good tuner. Remember, it's always better to have a custom tune vs. a plug and play or "staged" map. Always defer to the tuner's advice as to what to choose as ultimately he will be the one to provide custom support. Discuss your goals and budget and your tuner should set you on the right path. If you are a "plug and play" kind of person, review the options below and decide for yourself along with input from locals in your regional forum and the car parts review forum.

 

What will engine management do for me? Generally speaking, engine management optimizes several engine functions to create more horsepower and efficiency. The stock ECU is designed to ensure your car runs fine and monitors the engine’s output parameters. Utilizing an aftermarket engine management solution takes this to the next level.

 

Often times, car manufacturers will program the stock ECU with a known amount of “play”. This amount of play allows the manufacturer an extra level of safety and/or the ability to utilize this at a later date so they can have an increase in HP in later years. An example of this is where a 2001 car has 200HP and a 2002 car has 215HP. Some manufacturers couple this with additional parts to get increased HP levels, but this should give you some idea of the concept. From a marketing and sales aspect, this ensures that the public will continually be interested in the new year models, even if the body style does not change. While this FAQ is not about the science and art of auto sales, this may give you an insight as to why the stock ECU is not 100% perfectly tuned from the factory.

 

What are the least talked about benefits of engine management? Engine management solutions to one degree or another can reduce or eliminate black tailpipes, improve driveability throughout the powerband, eliminate the open/closed loop delay in 04+ Subarus, and increase MPG.

 

What Subarus NEED engine management? While every Subaru will benefit from engine management, the 04+ turbo models (except STI) "require" it. The reason for this is the EPA mandated greater restrictions on ECUs for 2004+ and allow manufacturers to exclude one model. Subaru chose the STI as the exclusion, so the restrictions are not on the STI. The restrictions have to do with the open and closed loop fueling. To put the restrictions in a nutshell without being technical, there is a delay between open and closed loop fueling that can allow your 04+ Subaru to run lean during this crossover point in how your car gets fuel. Lean is dangerous as it produces detonation which is the #1 factor is blown pistons. In stock configuration, 04+ turbo models are fine, but modifications such as exhaust work or higher really necessitate the use of engine management as those mods cause the fueling issue to rear it's head. Yes, you can run certain mods for a short time until you get engine management, but you should never kid yourself on 04+ turbo models that bolt on modifications are fine without engine management.

 

What about manual/electronic boost controllers or air fuel controllers?

A manual/electronic boost controller or air fuel controller really isn't engine management. MBCs are fine when used correctly on 02/03 WRX and 04+ STI by a judicious user. The issue gets further clouded on 04+ turbo models less STI, due to the open/closed loop delay. One can lump in the mix air/fuel controllers as well for the same reason. Usually those two devices are used by either cheap skates, n00bs, or advanced users who combine them with other forms of real engine management.

 

What types of engine management solutions are available? They fall into one of these general categories:

a. Reflashed ECU

b. Custom Tuned ECU

c. Piggyback Engine Management

d. Stand Alone Engine Management

e. Open Source Engine Management

 

Reflashed off the shelf ECU: This is your stock ECU that has had the programming modified. This form of engine management is best suited for people who:

a. Have a “set it and forget it” attitude towards engine management

b. Live in remote areas and do not have easy access to a tuner

c. Do not want to learn or are uneasy doing their own tuning

d. Want to modify their vehicle to a certain level and quit or add parts very infrequently

 

It is important to note that while reflashed ECUs are considered a static engine management option, they can be custom tuned by the end user by utilizing additional add-ons from the manufacturer or via a custom tuned reflash by an authorized tuner.

 

In addition, also consider that EcuTek tuners might have reflashes for your exact equipment set-up based on their prior custom tunes. This means that someone who has a full TBE might find the Cobb AccessPort a better plug and play solution, while someone with a full TBE, uppipe, headers, & a lightweight pulley may find an EcuTek reflash a better plug and play solution if they can find an EcuTek tuner with that exact map.

 

Recently for AccessPORT users, "custom maps" have become vogue. These come in the form of more specific maps for specific mods. Let say you have a stage 2 car with headers, TGV deletes, and a pulley. You email this information to a tuner and they will create a custom map for those mods to use. Some will send you a map and logging software, you load the map and data log, then the tuner sends you a final customized tune. While not as perfect as an in-person/on-dyno custom tune, it's a great resource for those in areas without tuners. Companies that do this are PDX Tuning, Perrin, and Clark Turner.

 

Examples of reflashed ECUs are the Cobb AccessPort and EcuTek (including Prodrive’s PPP & Vishnu’s reflash).

 

Reflashed custom tuned ECU: This is the next evolution to a reflashed ECU. This allows either the end user or a professional tuner to custom tune your vehicle to your specific modifications, wants and desires, type of gasoline used, and geographic area. This form of engine management is best suited for people who:

a. Will probably modify their vehicle frequently and require additional tuning

b. People with the ability to do their own tuning

c. People that live close to a tuner

d. People that want to get the maximum power and safety out of their car

 

Examples of Custom Tuned ECUs are Cobb Tuning’s StreetTUNER for end user tuning, Cobb Tuning’s ProTuner for professional custom tunes, EcuTek custom tune via an EcuTek tuner, and EcuTek's DeltaDash Live User Tuning, an end user tuning solution.

 

Piggyback Engine Management: This is an engine management option that works in conjunction with your stock ECU. Depending on the manufacturer, this solution works by the piggyback unit controlling some engine management functions and the stock ECU controlling others. This form of engine management is best suited for people who:

a. Will probably modify their vehicle frequently and require additional tuning

b. People with the ability to do their own tuning

c. People that live close to a tuner

d. People that want to get the maximum power and safety out of their car

 

It is important to mention that most piggyback units come with base maps. These base maps work very similar in function to a reflashed ECU whereas you can run the base map and be 100% fine, or when the day comes for someone to tune their own car or have it professionally tuned, they may do so.

 

Examples of Piggyback Engine Management are Unichip, Xede, UTEC, and others.

 

Stand Alone Engine Management: This is an engine management solution that totally replaces the stock ECU and controls 100% of the engine’s functions. This form of engine management is best suited for people who:

a. Will probably modify their vehicle frequently and require additional tuning

b. People with the ability to do their own tuning

c. People that live close to a tuner

d. People that want to get the maximum power and safety out of their car

 

This form of engine management is generally reserved for more advanced users and people going for really high levels of performance.

 

It is important to mention that most stand alone systems do come with base maps. Unlike the base maps that come on reflashed ECUs, these base maps are meant for your vehicle to run for a short period of time and are not meant to be used as a permanent solution as is the case with the other base maps as described above. Consider these base maps as merely as short term option until end user or a professional tuning.

 

Examples of stand alone engine management are MoTeC, Hydra, AEM, and others.

 

Open Source Engine Management: This can be the cheapest source of engine management available. In essence, you use a laptop, software, and a cable to reflash your stock ECU. Can be used to flash "staged maps" as a set it and forget it option or as a dynamic tuning tool either through tuners or by the end user. This form of engine management is best suited for people who:

 

Group 1:

A. Already have a good degree of tuning knowledge and understand the logic of the factory ECU (or have a strong desire to learn both).

B. Want to constantly tweak and experiment with their own tune. They actually enjoy the process.

C. May be changing/upgrading mods frequently.

 

Group 2:

A. Looking to get a custom tune from a professional but cannot afford or do not want to spend the money on license fees and/or hardware costs required of Cobb, Ecutek, etc. That is, they want their car to have a custom tune from a pro at the least cost. More and more professional shops are offering open source tunes and they can be just as capable as tunes from the commercial software.

B. Want an inexpensive (ex. XPT) or free (created by another user) OTS map. Might not go with EM otherwise because they feel it is too expensive. They are willing to learn the basics of logging with RomRaider to make sure the tune doesn't have any issues with their car.

 

Those people where Open Source Engine Management would be a BAD choice (assuming they are doing it themselves and not a professional tuner):

1. Want the easiest to use, troubleshoot, and closest thing to "set and forget" EM solution.

2. Are computer illiterate.

 

Examples of Open Source Engine Management are RomRaider, formerly known as Enginuity, EcuFlash, and others.

 

Can the dealer detect my reflashed ECU (AccessPort/EcuTek/Open Source)?

 

YES the checksum of the ECU changes.

YES the dealer can easily read the checksum.

 

NO the dealer has nothing to compare the checksum against there are many revisions of the WRX ecu they all have different checksums. If the dealer had someway of putting this checksum into a database he COULD verify that the code had been modified but at this time he doesn't.

 

The 05+ ECU and some of the 04s have the VIN in the ECU code. The current versions of reflashed ECUs only change the tables so the VIN will report when queried.

 

Bottom line: If you don't want modifications to be detected, don't modify the car.

 

What are some specific types of engine management While this FAQ does not go into specifics for every type of engine management, this thread covers many types. This link offers several comparisons of different system features as well. There are some not covered in these threads though and may be considered as well.

 

Generally speaking, what engine management option will give me the most power? Custom tuned engine management solutions will always give you more power. Every off the shelf engine management solution has a built in safety factor. This depends on the manufacturer. This is because their “Stage 1” or “VF-30” map has to safely make power for someone living in Phoenix’s heat and 91 octane, to Denver’s high altitude, to Boston’s cold and 93 octane. The gasoline and geographic variances can leave horsepower on the table.

 

More specifically, what engine management option will give me the most power? This is one question without a correct answer. Let’s say that you research a very comprehensive stand alone engine management system such as a MoTeC unit and decide that it’s the “best” for your car. At the end of the day, it’s about what the tuner is most comfortable with. Some tuners may be able to extract better results from a “lesser” system simply because they understand the interface better.

 

For someone interested in tuning their own vehicle, they should match their tuning skills with an engine management solution that they are able to understand and use correctly. For someone interested in professional tuning, they should consult with their tuner for their recommendations. Both of these actions will ensure a good tune with a minimum amount of rework, guessing, and trial and error. While most tuners are capable of learning new or more advanced engine management systems, consider the benefits of an “older/worse system” your tuner is familiar with vs. your tuner learning a “newer/better system” at $200/hour plus possible dyno time.

 

I have a reflashed ECU and am not seeing their advertised HP, why? First off, have you met their criteria EXACTLY? The #1 cause of low HP with reflashed ECU owners is their lack of meeting the manufacturer’s requirements. If they require a full turbo back exhaust and you only have a downpipe and a cat back exhaust, 100% of the blame is on the end user. As well, if they require a full exhaust and you have a full exhaust, uppipe, headers, and a bigger top mount intercooler, this can cause problems as well.

 

Also realize that HP figures vary. You cannot compare (for example) a manufacturer’s Mustang Dyno HP figures to your local DynoJet HP figures. Even comparing identical dynos to each other is futile as dyno software set-up, altitude, temperature, humidity, and other factors do not ensure an equal result.

 

In addition, realize that a reflashed ECU still utilizes many of the stock ECU’s learning functions. This means that in a perfect world, you will see the advertised HP from your reflashed ECU. This may also mean that on the day of dyno testing, your octane, the temperature, humidity, and many other factors are considered by the reflashed ECU when determining total power output. If the advertised numbers aren't there on dyno day, it doesn’t necessarily mean there is a problem, but rather, your ECU is protecting your engine from low octane, high temperature, high humidity, or other factors.

 

How much is a custom tune by a professional? Expect to pay $100-$150 per hour for the dyno time. Your tuner’s fee depends on their level of experience and pricing. Tuners generally charge $100-200 per hour for their time. The amount of total tuning time depends on the tuner and the amount of time you wish for them to tune your vehicle. Most tuners can get your vehicle within 90-95% of its maximum power within 1-2 hours.

 

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

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HYBRID BUILDS / FRANKENMOTOR FAQ

under construction

 

What is a hybrid build / frankenmotor?

It is a term used for using the heads off of one Subaru engine and the bottom of another.

 

Can you give an example?

A popular hybrid build is an EJ257 (STI 2.5L) bottom end (block/crank/pistons) and EJ20 (WRX) heads / intake.

 

What is the advantage of a hybrid build?

One of the biggest advantages is compression. Some decide to do hybrid builds to get higher compression then stock.

 

So what heads can I combine with what block?

Pretty much any head intended for any EJ engine can bolt up to any EJ block.

 

So whats the catch?

Most EJ engines are interference engines....meaning when the valves open they drop down into the cylinders. This is why when a timing belt breaks, you have to rebuild the heads.

 

Back to the point...

 

Some heads have valves that drop down into the cylinder further then others. I can't provide a complete lists of everything, however some builds require thicker head gaskets to avoid high speed valve interference....meaning the valves slapping the tops of the pistons at higher RPMS

 

All the hybrid builds I have seen are for turbo engines. Can I do this with a non-turbo engine?

Of course you can! The reason hybrid builds on N/A Subarus is not well documented is because most decide to do turbo builds.

 

Can I use my USDM EJ25D heads on a JDM EJ20K block?

Yes. I don't know what kind of benefit it would give you though. Usually people like to pair heads off a smaller engine onto a bigger block.

 

What transmission can I use with my hybrid build?

Just about anything. Any transmission that was meant to be paired with any EJ engine will bolt up just fine.

 

Can I use my stock ECU?

It depends on how big of a change you make. There is no concrete answer to this question.

 

Should I have some kind of after market engine management?

Of course! I actually suggest even those running stock to have some form of engine management. Stock ECUs suck.

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

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TUNING FAQ

under construction

 

What is "tuning" your car?

This is a term used for programming the settings in an aftermarket ECU

 

Do you mean that my stand alone or piggy back isn't plug and play?

Yes, thats what I mean

 

So how does one tune their ECU?

If you don't know the answer to this already, you should probably go get your car professionally tuned. If you want some basic information on how to do it yourself, I will cover the basics later on in this FAQ.

 

Professional tuners use one of two methods to tune a car

Dyno Tuning

This is probably the most commonly used method. Basically, the tuner will strap your car to the dyno and give it hell for a few hours while tweaking the ECU settings. Most dyno tunes are targeted towards wide open throttle driving, so normal drivability is sometimes compromised with a dyno tune.

 

Road Tuning

This is a less common used method, but tends to give you a much more precise tune based on real world conditions. Your tuner will drive your car around on public roads for some time, adjusting ECU settings as needed. This kind of tune will give you a good blend of normal driving and wide open throttle operation.

 

What are all these horror stories I've heard and youtube videos I've seen of cars blowing up on the dyno about?

Cars blow up on the dyno for several reasons. One reason is part failure.This is always a risk because when your car is on the dyno, it is being pushed to its limits. Another cause of "blow ups" is the tuner. When adjusting the air/fuel ratios, spark advance, duty cycle, etc....things can go drastically wrong.

 

So what will getting my car tuned do for me?

Ill sum this up as quick and simple as I can.

Air/Fuel

Your air/fuel ratios are very important. When running lean (too much air), your engine has a tendancy to pre-detonate the fuel. Pre-detonation can cause serious internal engine damage. The most common damage to Subarus from detonation is cracked piston ringlands.

Spark Advance

This is another way to combat detonation. If your fuel is ignited by spark before TDC, you're less likely to get uncontrolled detonation.

Fuel Economy

When tuning a car, this isn't really a major concern since most who do aftermarket engine management are going for as much power as possible. With that being said, a tuned ECU will run MUCH more efficiently then one that is not tuned. It will make more power and use less fuel.

 

I picked out a tuner and he gave me a list of mods to do before I got my car tuned. Should I listen to him?

Absolutly. Remember, the guy who is tuning your car is likely MUCH more experienced then you are. He probably knows what he is talking about. With that being said, each tuner has their strong points and their downfalls. While one tuner may be a pro at tuning Megasquirt systems, the other tuner down the street might not even know where to begin with one. Its best to provide your tuner with a car that has modifications that he is familiar with. That way he can tune it better, and there is less of a chance of it blowing up on the dyno.

 

Should I plan for disaster on the dyno?

Hope for the best, but plan for the worst. My first trip to a dyno resulted in a trigger wheel flying off of my crank pulley and destroying a bunch of stuff under the hood. A 3lbs metal wheel spinning at 6000rpms can cause a lot of damage when it brakes off. NEVER put your car on the dyno if you're not prepared to repair what might happen.

 

How strong are the straps that they use to tie down my car?

Pretty strong.....They are defiantly strong enough to hold your "stationary" 90mph car in place on the dyno. The chances of your car jumping off the dyno are slim to none as long as the tuner keeps his foot off the brake pedal.

 

Why was I told I need an extra o2 sensor bung?

This is pretty much standard. You need a free spot for an o2 sensor since this is what the dynos computer will measure your air/fuel ratios with

 

Stoich fuel mixture is 14.7to1...but my tuner told me that I want to get about 11.0to1. Why is that? Isn't that running a little rich?

Stoich fuel mixture doesn't really matter when you're running higher levels of boost. Running a little on the rich side does two things. The extra gasoline in the cylinders helps cool the cylinder walls, and it helps prevent detonation (since you detonate when the engine is lean)

 

What is the standard hourly rate for tuning?

This varies. I pay $150 an hour for professional dyno tuning.

 

How can I prepare my car to get tuned?

Make sure everything is in working order on your car before you get it tuned. This includes a fresh oil change, checking all your fluids, tires, etc. The reason is because if your car has to be shut off on the dyno and repaired, you're still paying $150 an hour for dyno time while the repairs are done. Do everything in your power to prevent this from happening.

 

What about Cobb Accessport? It says I don't need a dyno tune!

True. Cobb AP (and others on the market) will send you a file to flash over to your ECU. These are generic tunes that are close, but not perfect. You will always get a MUCH better tune having a pro tune your car for you.

 

So if I want to start street tuning my car myself, what do I need to connect to my ECU?

It depends on what ECU you are using. A laptop is a must. I like to use a power inverter so I can plug my laptop in to keep it from dying. On top of that, you need whatever cable / software that is specific to your ECU. This is usally either a USB cable or a Serial cable. Both kinds of cables cna be bought for pretty cheap. The software comes with your ECU, and some venders offer a download of the software on their website

 

What do I need to learn about before trying to tune my own ECU?

You need to understand how an engine runs. Not just the basics, but the computer operations and how the computer tells the car to delive air/fuel/spark to the engine. This includes air/fuel ratios, duty cycles, spark advance, ignition timing, TPS calibration, fan controls, fuel pump controls, launch control, flat shifting, map, etc. There is A LOT to it

 

So if I start tuning my own ECU, what will the program look like that I'll be working with?

It depends on what ECU you are using. Here is a picture of the Megasquirt software

 

Can I tune my car to run nitrous?

Yes you can. A stand alone ECU is a MUST if you want to do this.

 

Someone told me that I can set up traction control by tuning my ECU. Is this true?

Yes it is. Even if your car doesn't have traction control stock.

 

I got my car tuned, but I didn't end up with as much boost as I wanted. What can I do to get more boost?

Running E85 is probably the most popular thing done to acheave more boost. However, this requires its own tune.

 

 

DISCLAIMER : Tuning an ECU is a very dangerous thing to do. If you plug in one wrong setting, it can cost you your engine. If you decide to try and tune your ECU yourself, be VERY careful.

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

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CHECK ENGINE LIGHT

courtesy of obd-codes.com

 

P0001-P0099 - Fuel and Air Metering and Auxiliary Emission Controls

 

 

  • P0001 Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit/Open
  • P0002 Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0003 Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit Low
  • P0004 Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit High
  • P0005 Fuel Shutoff Valve "A" Control Circuit/Open
  • P0006 Fuel Shutoff Valve "A" Control Circuit Low
  • P0007 Fuel Shutoff Valve "A" Control Circuit High
  • P0008 Engine Positions System Performance Bank 1
  • P0009 Engine Position System Performance Bank 2
  • P0010 "A" Camshaft Position Actuator Circuit (Bank 1)
  • P0011 "A" Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 1)
  • P0012 "A" Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 1)
  • P0013 "B" Camshaft Position - Actuator Circuit (Bank 1)
  • P0014 "B" Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 1) - See Trouble Code P0011
  • P0015 "B" Camshaft Position -Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 1) - See Trouble Code P0012
  • P0016 Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 1 Sensor A)
  • P0017 Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 1 Sensor B)
  • P0018 Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 2 Sensor A)
  • P0019 Crankshaft Position - Camshaft Position Correlation (Bank 2 Sensor B)
  • P0020 "A" Camshaft Position Actuator Circuit (Bank 2)
  • P0021 "A" Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 2)
  • P0022 "A" Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 2)
  • P0023 "B" Camshaft Position - Actuator Circuit (Bank 2) - See Trouble Code P0020
  • P0024 "B" Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Advanced or System Performance (Bank 2) - See Trouble Code P0021
  • P0025 "B" Camshaft Position - Timing Over-Retarded (Bank 2) - See Trouble Code P0022
  • P0026 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Range/Performance Bank 1
  • P0027 Exhaust Valve Control solenoid Circuit Range/Performance Bank 1
  • P0028 Intake valve Control Solenoid Circuit Range/Performance Bank 2
  • P0029 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Range/Performance Bank 2
  • P0030 HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 1 Sensor 1)
  • P0031 HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low (Bank 1 Sensor 1)
  • P0032 HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 1 Sensor 1)
  • P0033 Turbo Charger Bypass Valve Control Circuit
  • P0034 Turbo Charger Bypass Valve Control Circuit Low
  • P0035 Turbo Charger Bypass Valve Control Circuit High
  • P0036 HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 1 Sensor 2)
  • P0037 HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low (Bank 1 Sensor 2)
  • P0038 HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 1 Sensor 2)
  • P0039 Turbo/Super Charger Bypass Valve Control Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0040 Upstream Oxygen Sensors Swapped From Bank To Bank
  • P0041 Downstream Oxygen Sensors Swapped From Bank To Bank
  • P0042 HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 1 Sensor 3)
  • P0043 HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low (Bank 1 Sensor 3)
  • P0044 HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 1 Sensor 3)
  • P0050 HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
  • P0051 HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
  • P0052 HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 1)
  • P0053 HO2S Heater Resistance (Bank 1, Sensor 1)
  • P0054 HO2S Heater Resistance (Bank 1, Sensor 2)
  • P0055 HO2S Heater Resistance (Bank 1, Sensor 3)
  • P0056 HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 2 Sensor 2)
  • P0057 HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low (Bank 2 Sensor 2)
  • P0058 HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 2)
  • P0059 HO2S Heater Resistance (Bank 2, Sensor 1)
  • P0060 HO2S Heater Resistance (Bank 2, Sensor 2)
  • P0061 HO2S Heater Resistance (Bank 2, Sensor 3)
  • P0062 HO2S Heater Control Circuit (Bank 2 Sensor 3)
  • P0063 HO2S Heater Control Circuit Low (Bank 2 Sensor 3)
  • P0064 HO2S Heater Control Circuit High (Bank 2 Sensor 3)
  • P0065 Air Assisted Injector Control Range/Performance
  • P0066 Air Assisted Injector Control Circuit or Circuit Low
  • P0067 Air Assisted Injector Control Circuit High
  • P0068 MAP/MAF - Throttle Position Correlation
  • P0069 Manifold Absolute Pressure - Barometric Pressure Correlation
  • P0070 Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit
  • P0071 Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Range/Performance
  • P0072 Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit Low Input
  • P0073 Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit High Input
  • P0074 Ambient Air Temperature Sensor Circuit Intermittent
  • P0075 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit (Bank 1)
  • P0076 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low (Bank 1)
  • P0077 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High (Bank 1)
  • P0078 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit (Bank 1)
  • P0079 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low (Bank 1)
  • P0080 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High (Bank 1)
  • P0081 Intake valve Control Solenoid Circuit (Bank 2)
  • P0082 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low (Bank 2)
  • P0083 Intake Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High (Bank 2)
  • P0084 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit (Bank 2)
  • P0085 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit Low (Bank 2)
  • P0086 Exhaust Valve Control Solenoid Circuit High (Bank 2)
  • P0087 Fuel Rail/System Pressure - Too Low
  • P0088 Fuel Rail/System Pressure - Too High
  • P0089 Fuel Pressure Regulator 1 Performance
  • P0090 Fuel Pressure Regulator 1 Control Circuit
  • P0091 Fuel Pressure Regulator 1 Control Circuit Low
  • P0092 Fuel Pressure Regulator 1 Control Circuit High
  • P0093 Fuel System Leak Detected - Large Leak
  • P0094 Fuel System Leak Detected - Small Leak
  • P0095 Intake Air Temperature Sensor 2 Circuit
  • P0096 Intake Air Temperature Sensor 2 Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0097 Intake Air Temperature Sensor 2 Circuit Low
  • P0098 Intake Air Temperature Sensor 2 Circuit High
  • P0099 Intake Air Temperature Sensor 2 Circuit Intermittent/Erratic

DTC Codes - P0100-P0199 - Fuel and Air Metering

 

 

DTC Codes - P0200-P0299 - Fuel and Air Metering (Injector Circuit)

 

 

  • P0200 Injector Circuit Malfunction
  • P0201 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 1
  • P0202 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 2
  • P0203 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 3
  • P0204 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 4
  • P0205 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 5
  • P0206 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 6
  • P0207 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 7
  • P0208 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 8
  • P0209 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 9
  • P0210 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 10
  • P0211 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 11
  • P0212 Injector Circuit Malfunction - Cylinder 12
  • P0213 Cold Start Injector 1 Malfunction
  • P0214 Cold Start Injector 2 Malfunction
  • P0215 Engine Shutoff Solenoid Malfunction
  • P0216 Injection Timing Control Circuit Malfunction
  • P0217 Engine Overtemp Condition
  • P0218 Transmission Over Temperature Condition
  • P0219 Engine Overspeed Condition
  • P0220 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch B Circuit Malfunction
  • P0221 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch B Circuit Range/Performance Problem
  • P0222 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch B Circuit Low Input
  • P0223 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch B Circuit High Input
  • P0224 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch B Circuit Intermittent
  • P0225 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch C Circuit Malfunction
  • P0226 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch C Circuit Range/Performance Problem
  • P0227 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch C Circuit Low Input
  • P0228 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch C Circuit High Input
  • P0229 Throttle/Petal Position Sensor/Switch C Circuit Intermittent
  • P0230 Fuel Pump Primary Circuit Malfunction
  • P0231 Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit Low
  • P0232 Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit High
  • P0233 Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit Intermittent
  • P0234 Engine Overboost Condition
  • P0235 Turbocharger Boost Sensor A Circuit Malfunction
  • P0236 Turbocharger Boost Sensor A Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0237 Turbocharger Boost Sensor A Circuit Low
  • P0238 Turbocharger Boost Sensor A Circuit High
  • P0239 Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Malfunction
  • P0240 Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0241 Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit Low
  • P0242 Turbocharger Boost Sensor B Circuit High
  • P0243 Turbocharger Wastegate Solenoid A Malfunction
  • P0244 Turbocharger Wastegate Solenoid A Range/Performance
  • P0245 Turbocharger Wastegate Solenoid A Low
  • P0246 Turbocharger Wastegate Solenoid A High
  • P0247 Turbocharger Wastegate Solenoid B Malfunction
  • P0248 Turbocharger Wastegate Solenoid B Range/Performance
  • P0249 Turbocharger Wastegate Solenoid B Low
  • P0250 Turbocharger Wastegate Solenoid B High
  • P0251 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "A" Malfunction (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
  • P0252 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "A" Range/Performance (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
  • P0253 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "A" Low (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
  • P0254 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "A" High (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
  • P0255 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "A" Intermittent (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
  • P0256 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "B" Malfunction (Cam/Rotor/Injector)
  • P0257 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "B" Range/Performance Injector)
  • P0258 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "B" Low (Cam/R
  • P0259 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "B" High (Cam/R
  • P0260 Injection Pump Fuel Metering Control "B" Intermittent Injector)
  • P0261 Cylinder I Injector Circuit Low
  • P0262 Cylinder I Injector Circuit High
  • P0263 Cylinder I Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0264 Cylinder 2 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0265 Cylinder 2 Injector Circuit High
  • P0266 Cylinder 2 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0267 Cylinder 3 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0268 Cylinder 3 Injector Circuit High
  • P0269 Cylinder 3 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0270 Cylinder 4 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0271 Cylinder 4 Injector Circuit High
  • P0272 Cylinder 4 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0273 Cylinder 5 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0274 Cylinder 5 Injector Circuit High
  • P0275 Cylinder S Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0276 Cylinder 6 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0277 Cylinder 6 Injector Circuit High
  • P0278 Cylinder 6 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0279 Cylinder 7 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0280 Cylinder 7 Injector Circuit High
  • P0281 Cylinder 7 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0282 Cylinder 8 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0283 Cylinder 8 Injector Circuit High
  • P0284 Cylinder 8 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0285 Cylinder 9 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0286 Cylinder 9 Injector Circuit High
  • P0287 Cylinder 9 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0288 Cylinder 10 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0289 Cylinder 10 Injector Circuit High
  • P0290 Cylinder 10 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0291 Cylinder 11 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0292 Cylinder 11 Injector Circuit High
  • P0293 Cylinder 11 Contribution/Balance Fault
  • P0294 Cylinder 12 Injector Circuit Low
  • P0295 Cylinder 12 Injector Circuit High
  • P0296 Cylinder 12 Contribution/Range Fault

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

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"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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DTC Codes - P0300-P0399 - Ignition System or Misfire

 

 

DTC Codes - P0400-P0499 - Auxiliary Emissions Controls

 

 

DTC Codes - P0500-P0599 - Vehicle Speed Controls and Idle Control System

 

 

  • P0500 Vehicle Speed Sensor Malfunction
  • P0501 Vehicle Speed Sensor Range/Performance
  • P0502 Vehicle Speed Sensor Low Input
  • P0503 Vehicle Speed Sensor Intermittent/Erratic/High
  • P0505 Idle Control System Malfunction
  • P0506 Idle Control System RPM Lower Than Expected
  • P0507 Idle Control System RPM Higher Than Expected
  • P0510 Closed Throttle Position Switch Malfunction
  • P0520 Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch Circuit Malfunction
  • P0521 Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0522 Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch Circuit Low Voltage
  • P0523 Engine Oil Pressure Sensor/Switch Circuit High Voltage
  • P0530 A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit Malfunction
  • P0531 A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0532 A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit Low Input
  • P0533 A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input
  • P0534 Air Conditioner Refrigerant Charge Loss
  • P0550 Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit Malfunction
  • P0551 Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0552 Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit Low Input
  • P0553 Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input
  • P0554 Power Steering Pressure Sensor Circuit Intermittent
  • P0560 System Voltage Malfunction
  • P0561 System Voltage Unstable
  • P0562 System Voltage Low
  • P0563 System Voltage High
  • P0565 Cruise Control On Signal Malfunction
  • P0566 Cruise Control Off Signal Malfunction
  • P0567 Cruise Control Resume Signal Malfunction
  • P0568 Cruise Control Set Signal Malfunction
  • P0569 Cruise Control Coast Signal Malfunction
  • P0570 Cruise Control Accel Signal Malfunction
  • P0571 Cruise Control/Brake Switch A Circuit Malfunction
  • P0572 Cruise Control/Brake Switch A Circuit Low
  • P0573 Cruise Control/Brake Switch A Circuit High
  • P0574 Cruise Control Related Malfunction
  • P0575 Cruise Control Related Malfunction
  • P0576 Cruise Control Related Malfunction
  • P0576 Cruise Control Related Malfunction
  • P0578 Cruise Control Related Malfunction
  • P0579 Cruise Control Related Malfunction
  • P0580 Cruise Control Related Malfunction

DTC Codes - P0600-P0699 - Computer Output Circuit

 

 

  • P0600 Serial Communication Link Malfunction
  • P0601 Internal Control Module Memory Check Sum Error
  • P0602 Control Module Programming Error
  • P0603 Internal Control Module Keep Alive Memory (KAM) Error
  • P0604 Internal Control Module Random Access Memory (RAM) Error
  • P0605 Internal Control Module Read Only Memory (ROM) Error
  • P0606 PCM Processor Fault
  • P0607 Control Module Performance
  • P0608 Control Module VSS Output "A" Malfunction
  • P0609 Control Module VSS Output "B" Malfunction
  • P0620 Generator Control Circuit Malfunction
  • P0621 Generator Lamp "L" Control Circuit Malfunction
  • P0622 Generator Field "F" Control Circuit Malfunction
  • P0650 Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Control Circuit Malfunction
  • P0654 Engine RPM Output Circuit Malfunction
  • P0655 Engine Hot Lamp Output Control Circuit Malfunction
  • P0656 Fuel Level Output Circuit Malfunction

DTC Codes - P0700-P0899 - Transmission

 

 

  • P0700 Transmission Control System Malfunction
  • P0701 Transmission Control System Range/Performance
  • P0702 Transmission Control System Electrical
  • P0703 Torque Converter/Brake Switch B Circuit Malfunction
  • P0704 Clutch Switch Input Circuit Malfunction
  • P0705 Transmission Range Sensor Circuit malfunction (PRNDL Input)
  • P0706 Transmission Range Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0707 Transmission Range Sensor Circuit Low Input
  • P0708 Transmission Range Sensor Circuit High Input
  • P0709 Transmission Range Sensor Circuit Intermittent
  • P0710 Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit Malfunction
  • P0711 Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0712 Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit Low Input
  • P0713 Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit High Input
  • P0714 Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit Intermittent
  • P0715 Input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit Malfunction
  • P0716 Input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0717 Input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit No Signal
  • P0718 Input/Turbine Speed Sensor Circuit Intermittent
  • P0719 Torque Converter/Brake Switch B Circuit Low
  • P0720 Output Speed Sensor Circuit Malfunction
  • P0721 Output Speed Sensor Range/Performance
  • P0722 Output Speed Sensor No Signal
  • P0723 Output Speed Sensor Intermittent
  • P0724 Torque Converter/Brake Switch B Circuit High
  • P0725 Engine Speed input Circuit Malfunction
  • P0726 Engine Speed Input Circuit Range/Performance
  • P0727 Engine Speed Input Circuit No Signal
  • P0728 Engine Speed Input Circuit Intermittent
  • P0730 Incorrect Gear Ratio
  • P0731 Gear I Incorrect ratio
  • P0732 Gear 2 Incorrect ratio
  • P0733 Gear 3 Incorrect ratio
  • P0734 Gear 4 Incorrect ratio
  • P0735 Gear 5 Incorrect ratio
  • P0736 Reverse incorrect gear ratio
  • P0740 Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Malfunction
  • P0741 Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Performance or Stuck Off
  • P0742 Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Stock On
  • P0743 Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Electrical
  • P0744 Torque Converter Clutch Circuit Intermittent
  • P0745 Pressure Control Solenoid Malfunction
  • P0746 Pressure Control Solenoid Performance or Stuck Off
  • P0747 Pressure Control Solenoid Stuck On
  • P0748 Pressure Control Solenoid Electrical
  • P0749 Pressure Control Solenoid Intermittent
  • P0750 Shift Solenoid A Malfunction
  • P0751 Shift Solenoid A Performance or Stuck Off
  • P0752 Shift Solenoid A Stuck On
  • P0753 Shift Solenoid A Electrical
  • P0754 Shift Solenoid A Intermittent
  • P0755 Shift Solenoid B Malfunction
  • P0756 Shift Solenoid B Performance or Stock Off
  • P0757 Shift Solenoid B Stuck On
  • P0758 Shift Solenoid B Electrical
  • P0759 Shift Solenoid B Intermittent
  • P0760 Shift Solenoid C Malfunction
  • P0761 Shift Solenoid C Performance or Stuck Off
  • P0762 Shift Solenoid C Stuck On
  • P0763 Shift Solenoid C Electrical
  • P0764 Shift Solenoid C Intermittent
  • P0765 Shift Solenoid D Malfunction
  • P0766 Shift Solenoid D Performance or Stuck Off
  • P0767 Shift Solenoid D Stuck On
  • P0768 Shift Solenoid D Electrical
  • P0769 Shift Solenoid D Intermittent
  • P0770 Shift Solenoid E Malfunction
  • P0771 Shift Solenoid E Performance or Stuck Off
  • P0772 Shift Solenoid E Stuck On
  • P0773 Shift Solenoid E Electrical
  • P0774 Shift Solenoid E Intermittent
  • P0780 Shift Malfunction
  • P0781 1-2 Shift Malfunction
  • P0782 2-3 Shift Malfunction
  • P0783 3-4 Shift Malfunction
  • P0784 4-5 Shift Malfunction
  • P0785 Shift/Timing Solenoid Malfunction
  • P0786 Shift/Timing Solenoid Range/Performance
  • P0787 Shift/Timing Solenoid Low
  • P0788 Shift/Timing Solenoid High
  • P0789 Shift/Timing Solenoid Intermittent
  • P0790 Normal/Performance Switch Circuit Malfunction
  • P0801 Reverse Inhibit Control Circuit Malfunction
  • P0803 1-4 Upshift (Skip Shift) Solenoid Control Circuit Malfunction
  • P0804 1-4 Upshift (Skip Shift) Lamp Control Circuit Malfunction

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

COME AND TAKE IT

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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Manufacturer Specific Codes

 

P1086 - Tumble Generator Valve #2 (LH) Position Sensor Circuit Low Input

P1087 - Tumble Generator Valve #2 (LH) Position Sensor Circuit High Input

P1088 - Tumble Generator Valve #1 (RH) Position Sensor Circuit Low Input

P1089 - Tumble Generator Valve #1 (RH) Position Sensor Circuit High Input

P1090 - Tumble Generator Valve #1 (RH) Malfunction (Stuck Open)

P1091 - Tumble Generator Valve #1 (RH)Malfunction (Stuck Close)

P1092 - Tumble Generator Valve #2 (LH) Malfunction (Stuck Open)

P1093 - Tumble Generator Valve #2 (LH) Malfunction (Stuck Close)

P1094 - Tumble GeneratorValve Circuit #1 (Open Circuit)

P1095 - Tumble Generator Valve Circuit #1 (Over Current)

P1096 - Tumble Generator Valve Circuit #2 (Open Circuit)

P1097 - Tumble Generator Valve Circuit #2 (Over Current)

P1100 - Starter Switch Circuit Malfunction

P1101 - Neutral Position Switch Circuit High Input (A/T)

P1101 - Neutral Position Switch Circuit Malfunction (M/T)

P1102 - Pressure Sources Solenoid Valve Circuit Malfunction

P1103 - Pressure Sources Switching Solenoid Valve Circuit

P1104 - Engine Torque Control Signal Circuit Malfunction

P1106 - Engine Torque Control Signal 2 Circuit Malfunction

P1107 - AIR System Diagnosis Solenoid Circuit Fault

P1110 - Atmospheric Pressure Sensor Low Input

P1111 - Atmospheric Pressure Sensor High Input

P1112 - Atmospheric Pressure Sensor Range/Performance Problem

P1115 - Engine Torque Control Cut Signal Circuit High Input

P1116 - Engine Torque Control Cut Signal Circuit Low Input

P1120 - Starter Switch High Input

P1121 - Neutral Position Switch Circuit High Input (MT Vehicles)

P1121 - Neutral Position Switch Circuit Low Input (AT Vehicles)

P1122 - Pressure Sources Switching Valve Circuit High Input

P1124 - TCS Signal Circuit High Input

P1130 - Front Oxygen Sensor Circuit Malfunction (Open Circuit)

P1131 - Front Oxygen Sensor Circuit Malfunction (Short Circuit)

P1134 - Front Oxygen (A/F) Sensor Microcomputer Problem

P1137 - Front Oxygen (A/F) Sensor Circuit Range/Performance Problem

P1139 - Front Oxygen (A/F) Sensor #1 Heater Circuit Performance/Range Problem

P1141 - Mass Air Flow Sensor Circuit High Input

P1142 - Mass Air Flow Sensor Circuit Low Input

P1143 - Pressure Sensor Circuit Low Input

P1144 - Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input

P1146 - Pressure Sensor Circuit Range/Performance Problem (High Input)

P1150 - Front Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit High Input

P1151 - Rear Oxygen Sensor Heater Circuit High Input

P1230 - Fuel Pump Control UnitMalfunction

P1244 - Wastegate Control Solenoid Valve Malfunction (Low Input)

P1245 - Wastegate Control Solenoid Valve Malfunction (Fail-Safe)

P1301 - Fire Due To Increased Exhaust Temperature

P1312 - Exhaust Temperature Sensor Malfunction

P1325 - Knock Sensor Circuit Low Input

P1400 - Fuel Tank Pressure Control Solenoid Low Input

P1401 - Fuel Tank Pressure Control System Performance

P1402 - Fuel Level Pressure Sensor Circuit Fault

P1420 - Fuel Tank Pressure Control Solenoid High Input

P1421 - Exhaust Gas Recirculation Circuit High Input

P1422 - EVAP Purge Control Valve Circuit High Input

P1423 - EVAP Vent Control High Input

P1440 - Fuel Tank Pressure Control System Low Input

P1441 - Fuel Tank Pressure Control System High Input

P1442 - Fuel Level Sensor Circuit Range/Performance

P1443 - EVAP Control System Vent Control Function Problem

P1480 - Cooling Fan Relay 1 Circuit High Input

P1500 - Radiator Fan Relay 1 Circuit Malfunction

P1501 - Idle Control System Malfunction (Fail Safe)

P1502 - Radiator Fan Function Problem

P1507 - Idle Control System Malfunction (Fail Safe)

P1510 - Idle Air Control Solenoid Signal 1 Circuit Low Input

P1511 - Idle Air Control Solenoid Signal 1 Circuit High Input

P1512 - Idle Air Control Solenoid Signal 2 Circuit Low Input

P1513 - Idle Air Control Solenoid Signal 2 Circuit High Input

P1514 - Idle Air Control Solenoid Signal 3 Circuit Low Input

P1515 - Idle Air Control Solenoid Signal 3 Circuit High Input

P1516 - Idle Air Control Solenoid Signal 4 Circuit Low Input

P1517 - Idle Air Control Solenoid Signal 4 Circuit High Input

P1518 - Starter Switch Circuit Low Input

P1520 - Radiator Fan Relay 1 Circuit High Input

P1540 - Vehicle Speed Sensor Malfunction

P1544 - High Exhaust Temperature Detected

P1560 - Back-Up Voltage Circuit Malfunction

P1590 - Neutral Position Switch Circuit High Input

P1591 - Neutral Position Switch Circuit Low Input

P1592 - Neutral Position Switch Circuit (MT Model)

P1594 - Automatic Transmission Diagnosis Input Signal Circuit Malfunction

P1595 - Automatic Transmission Diagnosis Input Signal Circuit Low Input

P1596 - Automatic Transmission Diagnosis Input Signal Circuit High Input

P1698 - Engine Torque Control Cut Signal Circuit Low Input

P1699 - Engine Torque Control Cut Signal Circuit High Input

P1700 - Throttle Position Sensor Circuit Malfunction (A/T)

P1701 - Cruise Control Set Signal Circuit Malfunction (A/T)

P1702 - Auto Trans Diagnosis Input Signal Circuit

P1703 - Low Clutch Timing Control Solenoid Valve Circuit Malfunction

P1704 - 2-4 Brake Timing Solenoid Valve Circuit Malfunction

P1705 - 2-4 Brake Pressure Solenoid Valve (Solenoid D) Circuit

P1711 - Engine Torque Control Signal 1 Circuit Malfunction

P1712 - Engine Torque Control Signal 2 Circuit Malfunction

P1722 - Auto Trans Diagnosis Input Signal High Input

P1742 - Auto Trans Diagnosis Input Signal Malfunction

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

COME AND TAKE IT

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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can a mod delete all of the stickies at the top of the forum EXCEPT the aftermarket parts and ugrade one....

 

then stick this one and the suspension FAQ located here

http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/suspension-faq-swaybars-struts-springs-coilovers-alignment-167956.html

 

WAY too many stickies up there. I just condensed all of them into two different ones...and added a bunch of stuff

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

COME AND TAKE IT

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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Great read a copy of this should come with the owners manual.

 

Thank you!

 

There is still some work that needs to be done to it. I have the basis of everything layed out, but over the next several days I'll be adding and editing a lot of stuff so check by towards Tuesday or so and there will be much more info.

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

COME AND TAKE IT

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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  • 2 weeks later...

I am at the end of my 98 Leg GT EJ205 swap. I am stuck on the radiator though. On that engine there is the extra coolant tank that routes one line into the coolant tank, and the other line into an extra nipple coming off the wrx radiator. The wrx radiator is too large for the Legacy, and the Leg one doesnt have the nipple.

 

How do I get around this? If I have to purchase a different radiator, is there any such as a Koyo replacement going to have that extra nipple?

 

Thanks

Jared

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Jared,

 

You can use a WRX radiator with some modifactions. You have to custom mount it on the bottom and trim away some metal (WRX radiator is taller).

 

You can also use a radiator intended for the older 91 - 94 Turbo Legacys. This is what I did on my swap.

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

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"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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Thanks for sharing your knowledge with this whole thread, much appreciated.

 

Perfect, thank you. I was wondering if I cut out that metal it would be ok. I also notched out the crossmember for my uppipe to fit, was just going to weld in a reinforcement. Noticed in here you said not to, hope it holds up.

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Under daily driving conditions you should be fine with it, however if you do any kind of agressive driving I would suggest you get either a turbo Legacy or WRX sub frame. Its not something readily available to buy, but when you do come across one they are not that expensive. I believe mine was about $150

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

COME AND TAKE IT

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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I say you should look in the H6 builds and post stuff about that. or i can give you my findings. cause it looks like it would be a good very good swap for our cars. I think the only thing that has to be messed with is one more engine mount and a some radiator modding along with wire crap. I've seen the engines from the SVX's going for around 1k to 1500 and the newer from like the outback H6 like 2 to 3k But I've also seen one reach 600WHP! with a supercharger and only using 22 pounds of boost... to do that with a STI would kill the car every time you drive it. lol. sorry for the novel lol
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