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4th gen aero


boxkita

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With spoiler:

60 mph run returns 155.4 N/34.9 lb of drag and 414.1 N/ 93.1 lb of lift.

100 mph run returns 406.2 N/ 91.3 lb of drag and 915.5 N/ 205.8 lb of lift

 

w/out spoiler:

60 mph run returns Drag: 157 N/ 35.3 lb, Lift: 476.2N/ 107.1 lb

100 mph run returns Drag: 409 N/92 lb, Lift: 1136 N/255 lb

 

wonder what happens if the rear wing is 6 inches longer? foot longer? higher above roof line?

 

Rules for ST allow the wing to be upto 7 inches above roof line and as far forward as centerline of rear wheel. Height restriction on rear wings too, but can be upto 36" behind car.

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I really want hood vents. So I'm curious to that. But I guess I don't want hood vents bad enough to learn cad.

 

I've got about. Idk. 3k photos to go through from the last few events. Maybe when I'm done sorting and editing those I'll start looking back into cad again. I have more access to a computer now so maybe it'll go smoother.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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These were just eyeballed geometries, so I think next it makes sense to do a sensitivity study in terms of length/position of the diffuser/splitter/dam/ride height, and check out some combinations of components. Let me know any thoughts on this.

 

One fun thought I had - I could parameterize this model so the CAD automatically regenerated based on external inputs of some geometric parameters. Could then feed this to a design space exploration software, which would build a response surface in terms of drag and lift. We could then have a neat little Python module that you could input your diffuser/splitter/dam geometry and ride height, and it'd return the corresponding lift and drag. This would take a bit of effort to set up, but once that's done I think I could push through 1000 runs to base the response surface on in a weekend. There'd be no visuals to go along with those points unless we wanted to pick some to run individually afterwards, though. Thoughts?

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These were just eyeballed geometries, so I think next it makes sense to do a sensitivity study in terms of length/position of the diffuser/splitter/dam/ride height, and check out some combinations of components. Let me know any thoughts on this.

 

One fun thought I had - I could parameterize this model so the CAD automatically regenerated based on external inputs of some geometric parameters. Could then feed this to a design space exploration software, which would build a response surface in terms of drag and lift. We could then have a neat little Python module that you could input your diffuser/splitter/dam geometry and ride height, and it'd return the corresponding lift and drag. This would take a bit of effort to set up, but once that's done I think I could push through 1000 runs to base the response surface on in a weekend. There'd be no visuals to go along with those points unless we wanted to pick some to run individually afterwards, though. Thoughts?

 

Uhm, you can do this? Omg. yes. Didn't even know this was possible.

 

Can it run parameters until it finds a negative lift solution or a lift that was less than stock? then flag it to run as an individual picture run?

Edited by boxkita
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Yup, can do that too. Would just run the parameterized model through an optimizer that seeks either maximum downforce, minimum drag, or a compromise between the two. I'll get going on the CAD stuff when I get a chance, but could use some help on what to parameterize. Things like splitter/wing/diffuser length height and angle along with ride height seem to make sense. Anything else worth including?
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Definitely. Also makes me wonder what we might be missing with the 2D solution, though.

 

sent you a pm.

 

At one point, I was a fair-to-middling programmer of obscure languages. Never learned python, but for this, I'm willing to learn.

 

The 2d seems a bit off to me. The front nose actually has a bit of hook under the front bumper, while the rear is really flat without the knob sticking out.

 

Can you share the 2d model you created? Or it in a special cad software only format?

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Yup, can do that too. Would just run the parameterized model through an optimizer that seeks either maximum downforce, minimum drag, or a compromise between the two. I'll get going on the CAD stuff when I get a chance, but could use some help on what to parameterize. Things like splitter/wing/diffuser length height and angle along with ride height seem to make sense. Anything else worth including?

 

smoothing rear window to make it more flat, like audi does with their wagons? Madrig was willing to make a full tailgate if I could get the design to him.

 

Figuring out how to cure the suction effect at the rear? The dragon of drag :)

 

Mounting a wing in the middle of the curl off the rear? Supposedly that's why f1 wings sit where they do... to gather air from over & under the car and redirect.

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This is awesome. I am definitely interested in making the rear underside more flat near the subframe and exhaust. I know some Python if you need any help. It has been about 3 years since I have done anything intricate in Python but I am sure I could dust off a little. I am getting married in a week so I will be useless for the next two (honeymoon)...then I am back to serious wagon work!

Wagon is LIFE! - 252,000 miles and climbing

Unofficial Build (Restoration) Thread

Steering Rack Rebuild

 

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60 mph wagon butt, no spoiler.

 

Drag: 157 N/ 35.3 lb

Lift: 476.2N/ 107.1 lb

I am interested to see a marginally longer wing as well (and maybe stupid long wing). Makes me think of the tail end of drag cars, how they extend the trunk lid with sharp fencing on the edge

Wagon is LIFE! - 252,000 miles and climbing

Unofficial Build (Restoration) Thread

Steering Rack Rebuild

 

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