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Timing Belt Replacement - what else at the same time?


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Almost 90k miles on my 2010 LGT and timing belt replacement is looming. I do plan to keep the car for another 5 years at least so while the schedule calls for it at 105k miles I figure I may just do it sooner rather than later to play it safe. Is it a good idea to replace the water pump at the same time or anything else for that matter while they are there?

 

As for the cost, I suck and usually just let the dealer do the job, anyone knows how many hours they bill for the timing belt?

 

Edit: found this https://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/timing-belt-266024.html, seems it answers my questions ...

Edited by Val Demar
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I recently inquired with my local dealer about the timing belt job on my wife's '10 Forester and was quoted around $800, not including the water pump/hoses/coolant. They would replace the timing belt, tensioner, idler and the drive belts and inspect the water pump. This is a non-turbo car. For all that you listed I see over $1000 easy. Money well spent if you can't do the work yourself.

 

While we are on the topic, do most people get OEM parts? The Aisin kit for around $230 doesn't seem bad.

Edited by whitexc
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I would buy the TB kit with OEM parts from

 

https://sixstarbernie.com/c-1171146-timing-belts-more-oem-timing-belt-kits.html

 

(They also sell on eBay as well) It will save some money over the Subaru online parts discounters. The 10-12 LGT water pump is unique and buy that from the dealership.

 

Thanks, that looks good. The plan is to buy parts online and have the dealer install it, should save me a couple hundred compared to getting these at the over-the-counter markup at the dealership. I'm overall happy with my dealer's service department and I don't have time to experiment with independent shops, I know some are good and less money, but for 4 hour labor the labor price differential isn't going to be all that much in my area at a decent independent place, and I can usually get a loaner and a free car wash at the dealer :)

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Thanks, that looks good. The plan is to buy parts online and have the dealer install it, should save me a couple hundred compared to getting these at the over-the-counter markup at the dealership. I'm overall happy with my dealer's service department and I don't have time to experiment with independent shops, I know some are good and less money, but for 4 hour labor the labor price differential isn't going to be all that much in my area at a decent independent place, and I can usually get a loaner and a free car wash at the dealer :)

 

You shouldn't be shy of having the dealer parts department price match either. Call and ask them before you order the parts. Also make sure you aren't foregoing the warranty automatically included in dealer repairs by ordering the parts yourself. There are various reasons dealers charge more for certain things. Dont be afraid to question it, and be sure they know you plan to use them for the work and for future work, they will usually work with you.

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You shouldn't be shy of having the dealer parts department price match either. Call and ask them before you order the parts. Also make sure you aren't foregoing the warranty automatically included in dealer repairs by ordering the parts yourself. There are various reasons dealers charge more for certain things. Dont be afraid to question it, and be sure they know you plan to use them for the work and for future work, they will usually work with you.

 

All good points, thanks. I've been their customer for many years, I'll make sure to mention it ;)

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You could go even cheaper than that by ordering from Rock Auto and getting the entire Aisin kit with those same components.

 

When doing the timing kit, you should do:

 

Timing belt

Timing pulleys

Water pump

 

It's also a good time to do:

 

Cam seals

Front crank seal

Spark plugs

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If you are going to do the spark plugs it is only a few more bolts, lol.

 

Ok, if I do the plugs. At the same time it seems it is something that can be done later on an as needed basis. The cam/crank seals do make more sense to replace at this time.

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If you're going to have the engine out, it'd be silly not to do the valve cover gaskets and spark plug tube seals, but if you're leaving it in the car, you could just wait until one starts to leak and do something about it then (or not).

 

As far as the cam/crank seals- with the timing belt would be a convenient time to replace them, but honestly, if they aren't leaking, I'd consider leaving them alone. Sure, they may or may not leak in the future, but if you accidentally booger one of them up installing it, they'll leak right now.

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I just replaced my timing belt with that AISIN TKF-006 kit myself about a month ago. Included 2 idlers, toothed idler and tensioner, water pump and belt. Along with two seals. Also replaced my serpentine belt and thermostat at the same time.

Took me about 8 hours total time. Including radiator flush and burp after radiator fans and everything was in place. Mind you this was my first timing belt replacement I have attempted by myself. There are some great write ups on this forum or find yourself a step by step YouTube video and you’ll breeze through it. Everything fit together perfectly with no issues.

I was quoted $750 for the timing kit replacement.

TB kit, Serp belt, blue coolant, thermostat, spark plugs. Cost me $300.

It easier than you think.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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The turbo models timing belts are quite a bit more labor intensive than the 2.5i EJ253, because the additional turbo piping, dual overhead cams and one of the water pump bolts is practically impossible to because the downpipe block it. (so you have to remove the downpipe which is easier to just drop the turbo and exhaust manifold/downpipe assembly together.) The are a couple thread that discuss the GT timing belt DIY procedure.
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Dealer wants 7.5 hours @$130/hr water pump including sans cam/crank seals labor only, no break on parts pricing and no warranty if I supply the parts. Rape. Their labor rates went up, I guess no harm to get some quotes from independent shops, if nothing else maybe at least I won't feel too bad doing it at a dealer after.
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The dealer is probably asking for the book rate in terms of time, and charging their normal hourly rate (I don't know if that's high or low for your area). It's only "rape" if they are charging a lot more than the going hourly rate, or if they do poor quality work. If going with the dealer means it's done right with OEM parts, that might be worth the cost. Not uncommon for places to not give a discount on parts if you have never done business with them in the past. You can always ask for a break on parts, maybe provide internet costs (shipped) for the parts list and see if they will match.
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I know. I usually let the dealer do the work for the reasons you mentioned but it doesn't mean I don't feel a bit raped when I drive away. I gave them discouted online pricing, they won't budge. If I go all in I'm looking to spend $1,500. All in all not a big deal when amortized over typical ownership. Edited by Val Demar
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