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I think I did it!!!


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Ok, so I took the Leggy to my GF's parents house today to borrow their indoor garage for a routine oil change.

 

Many EJ22 engines suffer from an inconsistent idle that fluctuates between as low as 100 RPM to as high as 1,000 RPM.

 

There are two solutions, both include the IAC solenoid. The first (And best) solution is to remove the IAC solenoid. It is mounted on the intake manifold under the plastic cover to the left and slightly closer to the firewall than the ignition coil. It has 1 plug going into it and a length of hose that leads to the intake hose. Once the IAC is removed, clean it thoroughly with O2 sensor safe starting fluid or throttle body cleaner. Spray all nooks and cranneys, including the outside of the part for good measure. Remove any and all buildup and make sure the part is visually clean. Reinstall the part.

 

The second solution is less thorough, but much faster. Remove the hose from the intake hose that leads to the IAC. Spray O2 sensor safe starting fluid or throttle body cleaner in the hose (Not too much. Older high mileage engines should have the coil wires from the ECU or spark plugs unplugged to prevent ignition from igniting too much starting fluid). Crank over the engine. Do this several times, spraying the fluid in the hose then cranking over the engine. When you're satisfied with the cleanliness of the IAC, give the hose a LITTLE squirt of the fluid and reinstall the hose. Plug the coil wires back in. Start the engine. This may need to be repeated several times, and if it doesn't seem to be working try it with ignition, but use less fluid. If you have 2 people you can remove the hose, start the engine with your finger over the hole in the intake hose. If you spray small amounts of fluid into the hose with the engine idling (It won't idle unless you cover the hole) it won't hurt it one bit.

 

Hopefully this works for everyone else out there too... :)

Edited by Platinum_Racing
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The low of 100 is actually 500RPM. The first tick on the tach is 500, not 100.

 

Just FYI.

 

The trick to smooth out the idle in my first-gen days (two Legacy Turbo's here), was seafoam through the brake booster line. That cleaned things up well. The IAC was cleaned with electronics cleaner (i.e. MAF cleaner). That car purred like a kitten... a kitten all juiced up on crack... with a straight 3" pipe coming out the back end...

[URL="http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/proper-flip-key-interesti-159894.html"]Flip Key Development Thread[/URL] "Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped." - E. Hubbard
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Wow! I would watch my Turbo on a select-monitor and the lowest it would ever get, even at it's worst, was 475RPM. Below that it would just stall. I had IAC wiring issues, though. Not a dirtiness issue.

 

Good work fixing it! That EJ22 will probably outlast the Corolla in the background of your avatar.

[URL="http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/proper-flip-key-interesti-159894.html"]Flip Key Development Thread[/URL] "Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped." - E. Hubbard
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If a car lives long or not depends often on the owner - if the owner cares for the car or not.

 

And caring for a car is not necessarily to throw a fortune in waxing on it but rather to catch the small problems before they become big.

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I check my transmission fluid, differential fluid, and oil once a week, and my coolant, brake, and power steering fluid once a month. Tire pressure I tend to check as needed. Oil change and filter every 3-4K miles. I keep extra fluid of every kind in the trunk, along with 2 full toolboxes with everything... Literally EVERYTHING I need to do instant repairs. I have so many tools in my car I don't even have to go inside for tools when I fix my car at home, I just pop the trunk and get to work, unless I need to turn the air compressor on and drag the hose outside... But even then I have my air ratchet and impact wrench back there incase I need to fix something at work.

 

I don't care about appearance, I can fix rust, I care about the mechanical aspect of a vehicle. Of all the problems I've had with this car, the only one I didn't catch before it actually broke was the right inner tie rod end. I caught and replaced the alternator the same day it started to make noise, the CV shaft a few days after it started clicking, the spark plugs and wires the same rainy day it started to misfire, and the rear strut mount as soon as I bought the car. I spray the dust boots underneath the car with white silicone grease once every couple months to keep them hydrated (Which prevents cracking). I only go to car washes to clean the undercarriage.

 

If love could make a car run forever I'm going to be driving this car right up to the pearly gates. :lol:

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I check my transmission fluid, differential fluid, and oil once a week, and my coolant, brake, and power steering fluid once a month. Tire pressure I tend to check as needed. Oil change and filter every 3-4K miles. I keep extra fluid of every kind in the trunk, along with 2 full toolboxes with everything... Literally EVERYTHING I need to do instant repairs. I have so many tools in my car I don't even have to go inside for tools when I fix my car at home, I just pop the trunk and get to work, unless I need to turn the air compressor on and drag the hose outside... But even then I have my air ratchet and impact wrench back there incase I need to fix something at work.

 

I don't care about appearance, I can fix rust, I care about the mechanical aspect of a vehicle. Of all the problems I've had with this car, the only one I didn't catch before it actually broke was the right inner tie rod end. I caught and replaced the alternator the same day it started to make noise, the CV shaft a few days after it started clicking, the spark plugs and wires the same rainy day it started to misfire, and the rear strut mount as soon as I bought the car. I spray the dust boots underneath the car with white silicone grease once every couple months to keep them hydrated (Which prevents cracking). I only go to car washes to clean the undercarriage.

 

If love could make a car run forever I'm going to be driving this car right up to the pearly gates. :lol:

 

Brotha, can I get a amen?

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  • 1 month later...
Amen to that! white silicone grease? I'm defiantly going to go buy some right now and put some on ALL my boots. That is ingenious...considering I have already replaced a CV joint on my last 1st gen legy. This should be a must do for all vehicle owners!
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hmmm maybe your right. never thought of that. well i already did it. good thing too i guess....there was a slight tiny bit of precracking happening to the boots. just ever so small. lets put it this way. it's a good idea to do if you don't go drive on any dirt roads for like a week to let it soak and work in. Excellent Idea tho if you live in the city!
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The best part about the silicone grease is when you hose down the boots after lubing them with the white silicone grease the dirt just falls right off and the grease will stay. Just re-lube the boots once in a while and they'll last forever. I just wish the Legacy had grease fittings. That would make life much easier.
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