Jump to content
LegacyGT.com

DIY Clutch Replacement Video


Scruit

Recommended Posts

Thanks dschultz. Yes, it is a budgetary decision. The cheapest quote I got locally was $1700 for the job. I can gets all the parts (sans flywheel, w/ TSK3) for about $400, so it was an easy decision. Even if I have to pick up a flywheel the savings will be worth the elbow grease.

 

I'll pull the transmission this weekend and see where things go from there.

 

 

Edit: I just realized I can swap in the 2007+ clutch assembly w/ flywheel for $580 from Fred Beans (another $150 for a TSK3). That seems like the obvious route - or am I missing something?

Edited by #define
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 193
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I beleive the '07 is a valid option. If not sure double check with Fred Beans first.

 

You should be able to drop the TSK3 from the installation. It's only needed if your shout is for some reason badly scored or gouged. If you have no problem with smooth clutch pedal travel then you probably don't need it. There are a few spiral lines in the snout (you can see them here) and I suspect they are to hold grease to ensure smooth movement. And the stock bearing is only $30 or so which makes the TSK3 a bit overpriced for the stainless steel sleeve they're selling, unless you really need it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From what I read I thought the TSK would prevent my premature TOB failure from happening again - and also provided insurance against the snout getting mangled (if it isn't already). Is that not the case? I'm new to the aftermarket Subaru stuff. If I can save the cash and just go w/ a standard TOB I'm all for it.

 

Ah, so I read wrong - the TSK3 is to prevent or fix the quill from damage. I'm assuming the TOB fails because it's just a shitty part, and that in turn damages the quill.

Edited by #define
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't *need* the TSK3. I believe the concern for wear/damage on the snout is as the TOB ages and stops performing to specs. And I imagine you would have to do quite a lot of driving with a failing TOB for that to happen. For about the past month or so, I would get a shuddering in the tranny when slipping the clutch from a stop with a certain amount of throttle. A little more/less slip or more/less throttle would prevent the shuddering, so most of the time I was able to avoid it. I noticed no damage to my snout.

 

That said, I installed it. I don't plan on going in there again and given the PITA nature of pulling the tranny, I didn't want to have to. But, I am someone who tends to be more conservative with such things. Just my nature.

 

You can use the 06-07 Flywheel with a stock clutch just fine. As I mentioned, order the standard hex flywheel bolts with it. That said, this guy is selling a NIB dual mass FW for really cheap. You can't resurface the dual mass when it comes time to change the clutch again, where you will probably be able to resurface the single mass, but you get to keep any of the NVH-reducing properties of the dual mass FW.

 

Also consider your long term plans for the car. If you're keeping it stock, the stock setup will do fine. If you might go to stage 2 (exhaust + tune), but you drive conservatively, then the stock setup will also do fine. But if you drive aggressively, track the car, or plan on swapping turbo's, you probably don't want to invest in a stock clutch. A few hundred more bucks buys you setup that will stand up to abuse and hold higher power levels.

 

I likely won't end up going past stage 2, but what cinched it for me was this: with a stock clutch on stage 2, even a brand new one, I would still have to be careful even trying to take off quickly (much less "launching") that I didn't smoke the clutch. As we all know, it's a bit of an act trying to slip the clutch just enough to avoid bogging the engine without revving/slipping too much. The stock clutch gives up really easily in that situation and I didn't want to have to deal with that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't imagine a reason the TOB would damage the snout. All the bearing does is slide toward and away from the diaphragm spring. Now if the grease were to be completely gone and dried up then maybe you would get some rubbing wear. But I think the clutch would be in need of change before then or the bearing itself goes bad. The only part of the TOB that is subjected to constant motion is the inner race (the copper coloured part in the picture I linked above) which comes in contact with the diaphragm spring. Since there's a little bit of pressure on it from the slave cylinder it always turns when the engine is running.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Speaking of grease, what is the recommended grease for the various clutch components?

 

Switching up to the single mass will shave ~3-4lbs of rotating mass off the engine which should be noticeable. Might as well do an "upgrade" while I'm in there. :) This is a daily driver, but I do have some occasional fun with it. My turbo MR2 is the project car, and it gets beat up well enough. That said, I don't have immediate plans for major power upgrades so I'll be fine. Thanks for everyone's help here. It'll post some updates when they are available.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have that transmission jack and it does the job very well.

 

I went and picked one of these up. The saddle is a little too long to fit directly up on the transmission surface. It hits the transmission crossmember and what I think is an engine crossmember. I'm going to cut a 4x4 to ~11 inches and set that in-between the jack and the tranny.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I went and picked one of these up. The saddle is a little too long to fit directly up on the transmission surface. It hits the transmission crossmember and what I think is an engine crossmember. I'm going to cut a 4x4 to ~11 inches and set that in-between the jack and the tranny.
Well, you're going to be removing the transmission crossmember...just place the jack forward or aft of it to hold the tranny while you remove the crossmember. The tranny is pretty easy to hold in place with just muscle power too. Also a regular floor jack comes in handy.

 

I have that exact one and it worked just fine without 4x4's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hm. Well, the jack saddle won't fit forward of the crossmember. I suppose I could put floor jack in that spot then unbolt the crossmember and fit the trans jack in that location. What is the weight distribution of the tranny? Front heavy?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is front heavy, but if you drain the fluid first it is quite easy to work with. A floor jack towards the front should work fine. I imagine that's how I got it started, but my memory is fuzzy.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't *need* the TSK3. I believe the concern for wear/damage on the snout is as the TOB ages and stops performing to specs. And I imagine you would have to do quite a lot of driving with a failing TOB for that to happen. For about the past month or so, I would get a shuddering in the tranny when slipping the clutch from a stop with a certain amount of throttle. A little more/less slip or more/less throttle would prevent the shuddering, so most of the time I was able to avoid it. I noticed no damage to my snout.

 

That said, I installed it. I don't plan on going in there again and given the PITA nature of pulling the tranny, I didn't want to have to. But, I am someone who tends to be more conservative with such things. Just my nature.

 

You can use the 06-07 Flywheel with a stock clutch just fine. As I mentioned, order the standard hex flywheel bolts with it. That said, this guy is selling a NIB dual mass FW for really cheap. You can't resurface the dual mass when it comes time to change the clutch again, where you will probably be able to resurface the single mass, but you get to keep any of the NVH-reducing properties of the dual mass FW.

 

Also consider your long term plans for the car. If you're keeping it stock, the stock setup will do fine. If you might go to stage 2 (exhaust + tune), but you drive conservatively, then the stock setup will also do fine. But if you drive aggressively, track the car, or plan on swapping turbo's, you probably don't want to invest in a stock clutch. A few hundred more bucks buys you setup that will stand up to abuse and hold higher power levels.

 

I likely won't end up going past stage 2, but what cinched it for me was this: with a stock clutch on stage 2, even a brand new one, I would still have to be careful even trying to take off quickly (much less "launching") that I didn't smoke the clutch. As we all know, it's a bit of an act trying to slip the clutch just enough to avoid bogging the engine without revving/slipping too much. The stock clutch gives up really easily in that situation and I didn't want to have to deal with that.

 

Very well said.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, it wasn't too bad getting the tranny dowels out of the engine. The turbo clearance was a PITA, but manageable. I'm going to pull the axles this weekend to get more room in there to pull the flywheel. I can already see what the failure was, and you all will love it. The TOB is scattered across the input shaft/snout in several pieces. I'll take pictures this weekend when I can get it out. Edited by #define
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I can see how it would be (much) easier. 2 hours is a great time, too. It's usually double-sided when you manage to get your engine removal time down to incredible numbers. :) Been there...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
is a tranny jack one of the "tools" i can rent from an autozone type place?

 

Its A loaner program. you pay for the tool and when you bring it back you get refunded. they have engine hoists and stands at the store I used to work at back in 03-04 so i don't see why a trans jack wouldn't be in the inventory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, it wasn't too bad getting the tranny dowels out of the engine. The turbo clearance was a PITA, but manageable. I'm going to pull the axles this weekend to get more room in there to pull the flywheel. I can already see what the failure was, and you all will love it. The TOB is scattered across the input shaft/snout in several pieces. I'll take pictures this weekend when I can get it out.

 

You shouldn't have to pull the axles to replace the clutch - I didn't. And I did it twice because I missed putting the pilot bearing on the flywheel the first time through.

 

None of the auto parts stores around me, including autozone, rent jacks of any sort. I was able to rent one (a trans jack) at a run-of-the-mill local tool & equipment rental place. Really though, if you have two guys I found it easier with just a floor jack and jack satnd

Edited by AndrewZ
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You shouldn't have to pull the axles to replace the clutch - I didn't. And I did it twice because I missed putting the pilot bearing on the flywheel the first time through.

 

I never updated, but I didn't pull the axles. Worked fine with them in. Just took some coordination with wiggling the tranny jack back. Plenty of room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You don't have to pull axles, but it does give you a little more room. My adventure last week was actually getting the transmission out from under the car on stands to crack the case and replace the front oil seal/main shaft needle bearing...I was yelling at my car a lot. Definitely recommend that you pick up some new axle seals if you pull the axels tho.

 

The best tool ever for seating your axle seals or rear seal on the tranny assembly is a $5 sprinkler system t-coupling that fits perfectly on the outside of the seal and doesn't mash the inside rubber part that protrudes out. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Making great progress with the assistance of the videos - thanks, Scruit.

 

We ran into a snag within the last half hour, though. Separating the transmission from the motor is proving to be the most difficult part for us thus far. We've wiggled, shook and pried where we could. Not budging thus far.

 

Edit: transmission now separated from engine.

Edited by Richard T
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Making great progress with the assistance of the videos - thanks, Scruit.

 

We ran into a snag within the last half hour, though. Separating the transmission from the motor is proving to be the most difficult part for us thus far. We've wiggled, shook and pried where we could. Not budging thus far.

 

Edit: transmission now separated from engine.

 

 

Going to be tough getting it back on again. The margin for error between keeping the trans lined up and clearing the turbo is very small. Having an extra pair of eyes and hands will do wonders. I did mine alone. :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use