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Proper Wheel Cylinder Procedure


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Hello, I have looked and unable to find proper bleeding for 05-09 Legacy.

 

I have the Motive Products Bleeder.

https://www.motiveproducts.com/collections/import-power-bleeder-kits/products/copy-of-black-label-ford-japanese-and-korean-import-3-tab-adapter

 

Is it better to do it this way, or the old fashioned way (Push /Hold) etc.

 

Is there a proper sequence to bleed by wheel? Rear/Pass, Front/Pass, RearDriver, Front/Driver, etc

 

I have heard for a long time that the farthest wheel cylinder first, then the next farthest etc.

 

And help would be great.

 

Mike

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I always do the bleed on the rear cylinders before the front. I think the driver's side rear is the longest brake line from the master cylinder.

 

I also have an issue with my 09 LGT and I am unsure what to try next. It has had fairly soft brake pedal feel since I bought it a bit over 2 yrs ago. My son and I put in new fluid last week. We used a combination of the Motive Speed Bleeder and normal two person bleeding. The power bleeder kept the reservoir full. We put almost 30oz of new brake fluid through it. Pedal is still soft - identical to what it was before. My 08 Legacy 2.5i has a nice and firm brake pedal which is what I am seeking. Can air be trapped in the ABS pump maybe and causing the soft pedal?

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Hello, so a soft pedal. I have a few questions.

 

1. How many miles are on the car?

 

I find that people tend to try and save money by getting cheaper parts than OEM Subaru. (Pads, Rotors , etc)

 

2. Are your Brake Pads , Rotor OEM Subaru?

 

3. Since you bought the car, how many times have you bleed the brakes?

 

4. What Brake Fluid did you use?

 

If there is a lot on miles on the car or the previous owner(s) didn't due proper maintenance. People who own Subaru think they can skip on things/maintenance.

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Hello, so a soft pedal. I have a few questions.

 

1. How many miles are on the car?

 

I find that people tend to try and save money by getting cheaper parts than OEM Subaru. (Pads, Rotors , etc)

 

2. Are your Brake Pads , Rotor OEM Subaru?

 

3. Since you bought the car, how many times have you bleed the brakes?

 

4. What Brake Fluid did you use?

 

If there is a lot on miles on the car or the previous owner(s) didn't due proper maintenance. People who own Subaru think they can skip on things/maintenance.

 

Yea, soft pedal with a bit more travel than expected. 09 LGT automatic. I'm at 65k miles now. I bought it almost 2.5 yrs ago with 36k on it. I am unsure what pre-sale work they might have done on it so it certainly could have aftermarket brake pads on it. It came with a full 6 month warranty. Last week was the first time I have bled the brakes on it. The old fluid looked fine and moisture was <1%. I assume the rotors are still OEM. We used DOT4 brake fluid from a sealed container. I think it is the store brand from the local Oreilly Auto.

 

I do notice that the pedal feel is stiffer and the pedal travel is less if I pump the pedal once or twice. To me it is a classic case pointing to air in the system but but after bleeding them like we did I do not see how there can still be air in there.

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Recommend taking it out and getting up enough straight-ahead movement (read: straight level road at speed) that you can force the ABS to engage, by locking up the brakes. 45ish should be enough. If you have worn tires, you may have to add a few more ticks on the speedo. Fresh, new, highly tractive tires should get you pronounced lockup pretty easily.

 

This will also re-prime the ABS pump and force brake fluid through it.

 

Do this cycle a couple of times, and check for any swerving, caused by any corner not responding linearly to the ABS lock-up. ABS Braking should be smooth, albeit noisy.

 

If you detect swerving, then it's likely that you either have an issue with air, or one or more calipers that are not responding correctly.

 

Make sure you recheck your brake fluid after the ABS re-prime, and top off as necessary. Rebleed the system.

 

If you do this, report back on your findings.

Edited by SBT
- Pro amore Dei et patriam et populum -
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I am pretty sure that the Ancel 610 scan tool that I just bought to read the airbag codes on the other car has the ability to cycle the ABS pump on and off. Might that accomplish the same thing or better to have pressure on the brake pedal while cycling the pump on? If there is air in the ABS pump then would the air be expelled into the brake lines or does the fluid go back to the master cylinder somehow?
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I believe that the ABS has no FB loop to the MC, so the fluid is going to expel the air into the brake lines.

 

Switching the ABS on/off electronically might get you there. I'm not sure the effect would be the same, because you're looking for the full-on pulsing of the ABS pump under lockup conditions.

 

FWIW, the ABS pump needs braking pressure from the MC to feed it, it doesn't self-prime as I understand it.

- Pro amore Dei et patriam et populum -
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