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Warming up the engine in the winter?


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No need to ever warm up the car really, even in zero temperatures just let it run for 20-30 seconds before driving and you’re fine as long as you drive gently until it is warmed up from the drive. Is it absolutely terrible for your engine if you do let it idle? Debatable.
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Been warming up my cars for more than 40 years and never had a bit of trouble with them for doing it. Sorry, but that is a fallacy. All the way back from carbs to the first electronically controlled fuel injection systems, it's never been a problem and that myth has been propagated for a very long time.

 

Engines benefit from warming up because it allows all of the different metal alloys within the engine to stabilize. ESPECIALLY a turbo engine as you initially start between 80-90 psi for oil pressure. Oil pressure when cold is important as it can literally spin rod bearings if the oil is not allowed to warm to it's operating viscosity. Normal running idling oil pressure is between 10-20 psi at idle and about 45-50 psi at highway speeds, and that's once it's warm. It's been that way for a very long time and will be that way for many years to come, on all sizes and types of 4 stroke engines.

 

I know there will be a lot of people on here that will disagree, but the reality is that it does not hurt the engine to let it warm up. Let it idle for an hour? A bit excessive, but still won't hurt a thing.

Edited by JmP6889928
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I agree.....I like the pistons to be round before moving the gear selector. It may not be as long for the LGT but my Cummins idles for at least 10 mins or a temp of 100*F before moving. I feel it is better for fluids to build some heat as well.
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Same procedure as always - start the engine, scrape off the ice/snow from the windows (and snow from the rest of the car if it's there) and then start to drive.

1. If the engine doesn't start there's no point in removing ice/snow.

2. The first minute of warm-up is sufficient for the engine to settle the worst of the issues and get the oil flowing to all parts.

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Been warming up my cars for more than 40 years and never had a bit of trouble with them for doing it. Sorry, but that is a fallacy. All the way back from carbs to the first electronically controlled fuel injection systems, it's never been a problem and that myth has been propagated for a very long time.

 

Engines benefit from warming up because it allows all of the different metal alloys within the engine to stabilize. ESPECIALLY a turbo engine as you initially start between 80-90 psi for oil pressure. Oil pressure when cold is important as it can literally spin rod bearings if the oil is not allowed to warm to it's operating viscosity. Normal running idling oil pressure is between 10-20 psi at idle and about 45-50 psi at highway speeds, and that's once it's warm. It's been that way for a very long time and will be that way for many years to come, on all sizes and types of 4 stroke engines.

 

I know there will be a lot of people on here that will disagree, but the reality is that it does not hurt the engine to let it warm up. Let it idle for an hour? A bit excessive, but still won't hurt a thing.

 

Many people do things wrong all their lives... :rolleyes:

 

Idling does not do much good, in particular it does not warm up other drivetrain parts. How much oil fuel dilution is an issue is debatable, but there are no benefits from excessive idling (>30 secs).

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Many people do things wrong all their lives... :rolleyes:

 

Idling does not do much good, in particular it does not warm up other drivetrain parts. How much oil fuel dilution is an issue is debatable, but there are no benefits from excessive idling (>30 secs).

 

I'm sure you have done wrong things all your life-it shows in your post.

Having been working on cars for almost 50 years and building engines for everything from standard passenger cars to extreme high performance race cars and off road trucks, I've never seen an engine damaged by idling. Go to a race and see if they idle the cars before putting them on the track. If there was going to be damage, they wouldn't do it.

 

If you have enough oil/fuel dilation to measure, then you have other problems and they're serious.

 

You are correct about the drivetrain, but we're not talking about the drivetrain here, now are we.

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I feel so bad for a generator or a power washer that goes from cold to balls out in a half-a-second. It just makes me cringe regardless of oil type, etc.

 

I know performance engines are different but if you look at diesel pulling tractors or alcohol tractors, they warm them up and get heat in the turbos before hammering down. Same with drag cars...not hot but some heat in them before hammer time.

 

I have always started and idled my vehicles and will continue to do so. It was around 40F today and my diesel took about 7 mins to reach my 80F departure temp. Even at 80F I give it just enough to get it to move. To me....worth the go go.

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I'm sure you have done wrong things all your life-it shows in your post.

Having been working on cars for almost 50 years and building engines for everything from standard passenger cars to extreme high performance race cars and off road trucks, I've never seen an engine damaged by idling. Go to a race and see if they idle the cars before putting them on the track. If there was going to be damage, they wouldn't do it.

 

If you have enough oil/fuel dilation to measure, then you have other problems and they're serious.

 

You are correct about the drivetrain, but we're not talking about the drivetrain here, now are we.

 

As I said wether idling causes issues is debatable, and I don't have enough data to claim one way or another. In any case, I tend to think that issues/damages would be minimal and relevant to long term engine reliability.

 

Race cars idling as an argument? Truly, no comment....

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I feel so bad for a generator or a power washer that goes from cold to balls out in a half-a-second. It just makes me cringe regardless of oil type, etc.

 

I know performance engines are different but if you look at diesel pulling tractors or alcohol tractors, they warm them up and get heat in the turbos before hammering down. Same with drag cars...not hot but some heat in them before hammer time.

 

I have always started and idled my vehicles and will continue to do so. It was around 40F today and my diesel took about 7 mins to reach my 80F departure temp. Even at 80F I give it just enough to get it to move. To me....worth the go go.

 

Oh, don't get me started on all the bros idling their diesels all the ******* time, not just when cold, while shopping or in a restaurant. I always have to fight the desire to take their keys and throw them away....

 

And folks claim cold idling diesel is just as bad...

Edited by unclemat
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Including Cummins themselves....

 

https://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/technical-service-bulletins-recall-support/549280-fuel-requirements-cummins-engines-service-bulletin-3379001-a.html

 

Engine Idling

 

CAUTION

Do not idle the engine for excessively long periods of time with engine coolant temperature below the minimum specification found in the applicable engine Owner's Manual. This can result in fuel dilution of the lubricating oil, carbon build up in the cylinder, cylinder head valve sticking, and/or reduced performance.

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My wagon is not garaged. My general MO* in Michigan winters:

 

Start car, turn on heated seat, turn on front/rear defrosters if glass scraping required. If scraping required, do so while car idles, drive when scraping complete. If no scraping required, drive immediately. Always drive mindfully until temp needle stabilizes.

 

*If single digit temps or below...I'm probably going to let it idle for a few minutes before driving, scraping or no scraping.

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Oh, don't get me started on all the bros idling their diesels all the ******* time, not just when cold, while shopping or in a restaurant. I always have to fight the desire to take their keys and throw them away....

 

And folks claim cold idling diesel is just as bad...

Is your second car a Prius?

 

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk

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My rule is min of 30 seconds regardless of temp. if its under 40 degrees F ill idle for 1-5 mins, but drive very slow and 2.5k shifts until the coolant gets to temp then 2 mins after coolant at temp I'll start romping.

 

Engineering Explained-

 

 

Athletes warm up, good advice for cold cars!

Good info on his channel.

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Is your second car a Prius?

 

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk

 

Hardly. 5 cars in the fleet with the average number of cylinders being 6. Only one is actually six cylinder. I will let you solve the puzzle.

 

Excessive idling is wasteful, harmful, stupid and in many places illegal. There are many idiots around, including this forum, who have no problem with any of these, sadly.

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Hardly. 5 cars in the fleet with the average number of cylinders being 6. Only one is actually six cylinder. I will let you solve the puzzle.

 

Excessive idling is wasteful, harmful, stupid and in many places illegal. There are many idiots around, including this forum, who have no problem with any of these, sadly.

Word. Wheel of Fortune is for puzzle solving.

 

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk

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