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Which wideband should I buy?


Mr-C
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Hi everyone,

 

I'm gearing this question towards you Tuning gurus out there (reason for posting in this section), I'd like to get your recommendation / opinion on which WB gauge should I get?

 

I'm hearing good things about the Innovate MTX-L Plus, even considered by some as the best one on the market right now.

 

Your thoughts?

 

Thanks gang :)

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AEM UEGO would be my choice personally there was one on sale for a steal recently on here but it’s gone now.

 

Thanks....and yea, big fail on my part for not jumping on that!!

 

I've got a follow up question regarding a post a just fell on (see below).....seems as though we can wire a Wideband and monitor it (and datalog I imagine) with an Accessport? This is a very interesting idea that I would like to know more about. If I can simply by the O2 sensor and controller without the gauge and set it up with my AP would be a Win-Win!!

 

Also how is the person monitoring Oil pressure with the AP....didn't think it had that option?

 

 

"Using an Accessport to display six gauges is a great use of the tool. You need the O2 controller built into the gauge, and you feed the 5V signal out of the controller into your harness. I used the TGV left input into the ECM, and then display the TGV left signal on my Accessport display. I watch oil pressure, AFR, boost, water temperature, and switch out the bottom two to other sensors. I've watched the AVCS cam timing on both sides, but usually keep two knock sensors displayed..."

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Ive had an Innovate LC-2 for 3 problem-free Years. It is wired into a VBG1 and also wired into a tgv-input (tgv were deleted) so I can log and monitor it via BTSSM or Rom Raider.
"Striving to better, oft we mar what's well." - Bill Shakespeare - car modder
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Ive had an Innovate LC-2 for 3 problem-free Years. It is wired into a VBG1 and also wired into a tgv-input (tgv were deleted) so I can log and monitor it via BTSSM or Rom Raider.

 

Nice!!

 

So you don't have an AP I gather but I imagine its the same thing at the end of the day?

 

Do you have anything documented you can share?

 

 

Thanks!

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I would have to dig up some old posts. It’s all in the BTSSM thread as well. The basics of it:

 

When deleting the TGV sensor it opens up two 0-5v signal inputs on the ecu. So I configure the secondary signal output on the wideband controller for 0-5v. Cross-reference the ecu definitions to find the correct signal intput (left or right side tgv). Then ,using BTSSM or RR, configure a Custom Field with the correct ecu input that we just found and the formula to decipher the analog voltage to that ecu input.

"Striving to better, oft we mar what's well." - Bill Shakespeare - car modder
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I've been using Innovate AFR gauges for 15+ years. They've always been a pain, but they're dead reliable. For my OBXT, I recently picked up this one:

 

https://www.amazon.com/Innovate-Motorsports-3892-Wideband-Oxygen/dp/B013UG0ERE/ref=sr_1_1?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1532808341&sr=1-1&keywords=Innovate+Motorsports+3892+PSB-1+Boost%2FWideband+Oxygen+Gauge+Kit&dpID=41IRTB4YI2L&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

 

The calibration process was super simple compared to the old LC-_ units. And the install was really straightforward. In the end, it's an AFR+Bosst+shift light+boost cut all in one gauge hole, so it's not a bother to have to worry about multiple gauge pods on your dash. I'm really happy with it.

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They used to be a pain to calibrate - You had to install a ground wire that remained disconnected mount a light somewhere, and then whenever you had to calibrate the gauge, you had to go through some sequence of holding it to ground for a certain number of seconds and count the light blinks. And since it was separate from the gauge, then you never knew if it was the gauge that was reading incorrectly or the LC-1 transmitting incorrectly. Oh, and they recommended recalibrating it every 6 or 12 months (I never did that).

 

But as I said, the new one is totally easy to calibrate. And it works with it's own gauge, so there is less ambiguity in the process. Also the calibration is supposed to only be one time for the lifetime of the gauge.

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Um, an lc-1 is supposed to be calibrated like twice a year on street cars. I hate having to remove them to calibrate them. On the race cars they have to be calibrated every race/every time we pull the dp.

 

I am getting lazy as I age. Part of why I like the uego. Its just easy.

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Right, that's what I was describing - the older units (like the LC-1/2). And I'm totally on the same page, it's too much work for a street car. I was looking at the AEM UEGO units when I came across the one I bought. This new generation of Innovate units are simple to calibrate like the AEM is.
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Thanks for the feedback/info,

 

I've got another question....my aftermarket DP already has a bung for an O2 but its just after the turbo (maybe 10"-12" or so). Innovate recommends having the WB installed 24" from the turbo....not sure if this is a general recommendation from other manufacturers such as AEM?

 

I'd like to use the bung already in place instead of having a new hole pierced, etc....

 

What are your thoughts on that?

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^ agreed. Yes they all recommend that. Your options are:

 

1) Keep the stock O2 in the rear location and put the wideband in the bellmouth. Higher heat, shorter sensor life.

 

2) Remove the stock sensor and shut off all related codes, and use the rear bung for the wideband.

 

3) Switch the factory to the top of the bellmouth and put the wideband in the rear bung. You'd still have to disable the O2 codes with this option, but you might already have the codes disabled by running an aftermarket downpipe.

 

For me, I just went with option 1. You'll still get a few years out of an O2 sensor in that location, and it makes it easier to swap whenever the time comes. And of course it makes it even easier for free-air calibration in that location.

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