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Post Turbo Failure Engine Flush Procedure?


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Hi guys... Turbo noob here.

 

I literally just bought my 2005 legacy gt wagon. It ran and drove PERFECT for the test drive and the majority of the hour drive home. I get within a few miles, and long story short, turbo died (not catastrophic failure, but the turbine was definitely contacting the housing). I drove it maybe 20 miles before I knew what had happened, but I was driving very gently.

 

My question is this: what exactly do I need to do to ensure my engine doesn't go next? I've read up a lot on the banjo bolts and oil system. But what is the absolute best way to clean out the engine? Do like 5 oil changes in a 500 mile time span? I've heard bad things about engine flush products.

 

Many thanks in advance

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You may get lucky, since you did not get a lot of metal particles in the oil yet. Unfortunately, though a flush is a good idea, it is no guarantee you won't have problems later on.

 

Make sure you do the steps in that FAQ. Metal particles in the oil have killed many of these engines.

 

Drain the oil into a clean container. If possible, run the oil through a fine mesh strainer. See what debris you find in the oil.

 

Suggest you remove the oil pan. It is very hard to clean all the metal debris out. You might want to just put on a new oil pan.

 

Replace the oil cooler. It's got too many nooks and crannies to clean out.

 

Remove, clean & replace the banjo bolt filters.

 

Put in fresh, inexpensive 10W-30 oil & filter. Start the engine and let it idle until it comes up to temperature and the fans kick on. Change the oil. You may want to cut your oil filter open to see what it filtered out.

 

Change oil and filter again at 500 miles/1500 miles/3000 miles. Then go back to your standard oil change interval (3750 miles is Subaru recommendation).

 

Keep an eye on your oil pressure if possible. Low oil pressure is a warning sign you may have bearing damage.

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Thanks for the info. Definitely planning on getting a new pan and oil cooler. Doing the banjo bolt screens is on my to do list tonight. As well as checking out the OCVs. Any other problem areas that I should check for clogs and filings? I hope to hell I get lucky enough To escape spinning a bearing.... I'm on an extremely tight budget because of this failure and I'd prefer not to do an engine build any time soon.
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In this case, the banjo screens may have actually done what they were supposed to and helped you by keeping metal debris out of the OCVs and AVCS cam actuators.

 

The damage can be to main bearings, rod bearings or camshaft journals. You did catch it early, so hopefully you will avoid the worst.

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I hope you have $4K-$8k sitting around somewhere.

 

You may be able to do a few flushes and get a few thousand more miles out of it, but in all reality every component that oil touches needs to be replaced and/or reworked.

 

Sounds like she's a ticking time bomb in her current condition.

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Even though the outlook looks grim, I'm going to try like hell to get every last bit of filings out of this thing to attempt to save this motor... I'm fresh out of college and can't really afford a new motor at the moment. Has anyone gotten away with saving theirs from certain death? Or does everyone think I'm doomed here?
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There is always hope. :) Your turbo did not get to the ball bearings in a blender stage of self-destruction. You caught the problem when you heard the turbo making noise, but who knows how long it has been shedding metal before that. If you had significant metal debris in the oil, some engine damage has already happened. Getting all of the metal debris out is difficult.

 

Several people here did manage to save their engine because they caught it very early and stopped driving immediately. You may be OK for awhile, but be prepared for the worst.

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There is always hope. :) Your turbo did not get to the ball bearings in a blender stage of self-destruction. You caught the problem when you heard the turbo making noise, but who knows how long it has been shedding metal before that. If you had significant metal debris in the oil, some engine damage has already happened. Getting all of the metal debris out is difficult.

 

Several people here did manage to save their engine because they caught it very early and stopped driving immediately. You may be OK for awhile, but be prepared for the worst.

 

 

 

Man, I've been mulling it over in my head since I found the problem. I think u might be ok because the debris was so fine.... But who knows. Thanks for giving me a little more hope. I'll report back once shes running again.

 

Now I'm just trying to decide on a vf40, vf46, or a vf52.... But I'm not sure if I can afford to get a protune or not.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • 1 year later...

So, one year and about 10,000 miles later, she's still running strong. Keeping up on regular maintenance and running rotella t6. I ended up buying another 05 legacy gt that had the same exact issue, so hopefully I can save that engine too. Sounds like the previous owner stopped driving it the second they heard what I belive was the turbine contacting the housing, so I'm hopeful this one will survive as well.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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