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Intake/Vacuum Leaks and YOU! PICS INSIDE


cryo

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Turns out its a camshaft sensor. I went ahead and pulled it out and it has an oring to seal.

 

I guess im buying a $100 oring now.

 

I'm looking at the same damn oring, trying to figure out what size to replace it with. Annoying. :spin:

"Bullet-proof" your OEM TMIC! <<Buy your kit here>>

 

Not currently in stock :(

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Maybe somebody can help me out here. I just found a vaccum leak coming from a sensor im not familiar with.

Sensor is black and bolted to the top rear passenger head, under the turbo kinda. What is this sensor and how does it seal? Bubbles like crazy with soap/pressure test.

 

In case you need it, that's a cam sensor and the part number is 22056AA140. $79 from heuberger (plus shipping I'd imagine). I have the same issue although it's been fairly minor. I'm still searching for the right oring...

"Bullet-proof" your OEM TMIC! <<Buy your kit here>>

 

Not currently in stock :(

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sometimes the previous scaling could have been worked around a leak so that's a possibility, otherwise it still could have a leak, bad sensor etc

 

Dave

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Providing unmatched customer service and a Premium level of Dyno/E-tuning to the Community

 

cryotuneperformance@yahoo.com

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  • 2 months later...
Hello there,

 

This quick writeup is hopefully going to help those who are unfamiliar with their engine bay help find and fix the more simple vacuum and pressure/boost leaks most common with these cars.

 

These pictures will be used as a loose reference for those searching to see a physical picture of what is described by most members that could be causes of leaks and struggles.

 

Intake/Vac leaks are one of the biggest headaches when tuning so the opportunity to go through the engine bay and check things out is always a plus.

 

The biggest thing to make sure when reading this is it assumes you have checked to make sure all worm gear clamps and such are tightened down at the airbox,turbo inlet, top mounted intercooler coupler to throttle body and to intercooler. These are simple things some people don't check first and causes a bunch of headaches for them.

 

This is a video showing what kind of leaks are possible and then pictures breaking down specific areas

 

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=377734489070626

 

1. This first picture is showing the turbo's wastegate hose *silver bell*, The turbo inlet *bigger black hose connected to turbo*, The turbo nipple hose and the turbo to intercooler mounting flange. These areas are prone to leak if the intercooler is not mounted properly and flush, The hoses are not seated on the hose barbs and if the turbo inlet has been chewed away by the clamp being tightened too much/not enough or just adjusted too many times because of age. If its oily and looks like rubber is coming through the worm gears section of the clamp its probably leaking.

 

http://legacygt.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=200133&d=1420422748

 

2. This next picture is part of the next picture as well when it comes to descriptions. These intercoolers can leak from the plastic end tanks once they have aged OR are pushed at higher boost levels. The aluminum "fingers" start to fold up and the black plastic end tank starts to move away from the core which causes leaks. This is pointing at the underside of the core to explain it can leak from the bottom as well as the top.

 

http://legacygt.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=200134&d=1420422748

 

3.This picture shows what was discussed in the last picture which is leaks at the intercooler to end take mounting area. These "fingers" can start to fold up over time because of age or being ran at higher boost levels and cause the end tank to separate from the core. If you look closely you can see where oil is escaping in the boost vapor and actually causing a spot where the intercooler is leaking. This is a common issue with this models intercooler.

 

http://legacygt.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=200135&d=1420422748

 

4. This next picture is on the drivers side of the intake manifold between the two intake manifold runners. This is another vac line that can pop off so its good to check and ziptie. This also points at the area you might see an intake manifold gasket or anything leaking related to the tgv assemblies.

 

http://legacygt.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=200136&d=1420422748

 

5. There is a lot going on in this area so it needs to be checked and ziptied/clamped as best as possible. This is at the turbo inlet area to the left side of the alternator. This is where the Stock electronic boost controller mounts and there are a lot of lines in this area.

 

http://legacygt.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=200137&d=1420422748

 

6. This next pic can be a little confusing but most of the arrows are pointing toward the lines coming to and from the blow off valve. These need to be free of obstruction and connected tightly. Also make sure the gasket is in place on the bov if equipped. The arrow pointing under the intercooler is actually supposed to be pointed at the throttle body coupler and the fact that sometimes to get to the clamp closest to the throttle body you may have to go from under the cooler. There is a plastic sleeve on the stock throttle body hose that's prone to leak and can cause strange high pitched sounds when pinched open under boost. This has been said to be removed without issue but some say its very hard to get it sealed without it because of the design.

 

http://legacygt.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=200138&d=1420422748

 

7. This next pic was used from a google search as I couldn't find a good lighting pic to demonstrate its location best. This is conneted right near the center of the rear of the intake manifold right under the top mounted intercooler. Its very hard to get to with the intercooler in place but is well known for popping off and causing people hassles. This can be ziptied or replaced with a barbed T fitting *one is supplied by a forum vendor turkeylord*.

 

http://legacygt.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=200139&d=1420422748

 

This writeup is designed to help and the more comments and such people can provide will help others in their searches for leaks and hassles. Always keep in mind the age of the vehicles and that vacuum lines can crack or wear through with contact so the leak may not always be at one end of the hose either.

 

Hope this helps and bump it up to the top for others if you like the info

 

Dave

 

 

I never realized prior to this that my intercooler had a small leak. I didn't connect the oil residue on the end tank with a boost leak. I feel retarded.:icon_conf Thank you for this!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Car is ideling at +8% fueling and not hitting target boost so I was trying to trace leaks and ran into some odd issues. First I couldn’t get the carb cleaner trick to work. Even spraying carb cleaner straight into the intake the car didn’t seem to respond. But I was able to use oil blowby residue to find some boost leaks.

 

Throttle body to intercooler hose has an obvious leak, lots of oil spray in that area. There was also a lot of oil spray on the BACK of the throttle body though. How common is it for that throttle to manifold gasket to fail? Looks like a pain to get it so don’t want to remove it unnecessary.

 

There was also a lot of oil spray residue around the turbo side of the turbo inlet tube. That shouldn’t ever be pressurized and I couldn’t find any visible holes in the pipe. What would cause oil spray in that area?

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Car is ideling at +8% fueling and not hitting target boost so I was trying to trace leaks and ran into some odd issues. First I couldn’t get the carb cleaner trick to work. Even spraying carb cleaner straight into the intake the car didn’t seem to respond. But I was able to use oil blowby residue to find some boost leaks.

 

Throttle body to intercooler hose has an obvious leak, lots of oil spray in that area. There was also a lot of oil spray on the BACK of the throttle body though. How common is it for that throttle to manifold gasket to fail? Looks like a pain to get it so don’t want to remove it unnecessary.

 

There was also a lot of oil spray residue around the turbo side of the turbo inlet tube. That shouldn’t ever be pressurized and I couldn’t find any visible holes in the pipe. What would cause oil spray in that area?

 

I've never got the carb cleaner trick to work. Just make a DIY boost leak tester - it's like $5 - $8 in parts from home depot.

 

A few things. Have you replaced your Intake Manifold to TGV gaskets?

The gasket in the throttlebody is very easy to replace. Need to remove intercooler and you can see and easily access the bolts that hold the TB. Just remove the 2 or 3 bolt, pull it open and put in the new gasket.

 

The tubo inlet gets oily after many miles. I had to replace mine (hole under the clamp) around 60k miles or so.

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I've never got the carb cleaner trick to work. Just make a DIY boost leak tester - it's like $5 - $8 in parts from home depot.

 

I actually built one a few years back, but at the time couldn't figure out how to cap the PCV system lines to keep from presurizing the block. I tried it at low pressure and it never held anything, but didn't hear a leak ether.

 

A few things. Have you replaced your Intake Manifold to TGV gaskets?

The gasket in the throttlebody is very easy to replace. Need to remove intercooler and you can see and easily access the bolts that hold the TB. Just remove the 2 or 3 bolt, pull it open and put in the new gasket.

 

Pulled the service manual and you're right, that dosnt look too bad at all! I'll order one and replace it when I put in the new TB hose.

 

No I haven't replaced those gaskets, are they a common failure point even if you've never taken the manifold off?

 

The tubo inlet gets oily after many miles. I had to replace mine (hole under the clamp) around 60k miles or so.

 

Maybe I just need to find a shop with a smoke tester at this point :spin:

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I actually built one a few years back, but at the time couldn't figure out how to cap the PCV system lines to keep from presurizing the block. I tried it at low pressure and it never held anything, but didn't hear a leak ether.

 

 

 

Pulled the service manual and you're right, that dosnt look too bad at all! I'll order one and replace it when I put in the new TB hose.

 

No I haven't replaced those gaskets, are they a common failure point even if you've never taken the manifold off?

 

 

 

Maybe I just need to find a shop with a smoke tester at this point :spin:

 

 

Let's not give up so easy. :) Especially being stage 2 you really need to monitor and fix these issues.

 

Before I bought this "project" car I only ever changed fluids in a car. Now I'm replacing gaskets, lines, fluids, axles, etc... just from the help on this forum.

 

I don't bother plugging the lines and have found numerous leaks. Dont' go crazy with the pressure and you'll be fine. I found my TGV was leaking where the senor is on the 05/06 (blocked on 07+) from a smoke tester I made, only needed a few PSI to get it to leak. I'd say use your boost tester again, get a spray bottle with soapy water and hit all the main leaky spots with that, then pressure the system. 5 - 10 PSI shouldn't hurt anything.

 

You could do the cheap test method. Plug up the intake with your boost tester or a pint paint can, pull the smaller line off the BPV/BOV and blow into with lung power. See if you can hear any leaks or if it holds pressure.

 

The TGV gaskets are a weak point, the older ones are smaller and get very hard, so they allow leaks at cold temps/idle.

 

http://legacygt.com/forums/showthread.php/diy-rough-idle-cold-start-cold-temps-lgt-07-09-155325.html

 

The intake manifold will take some time to get up to replace the gaskets. I followed that thread and used gasket picks to get everything situated. Now people say taking the TGV and Manifold in one piece is the easiest way to get that off, so that can be another option.

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Looking at that guide, it looks like the manifold seals may be causing some of the gunk around the throttle body and turbo inlet.

 

Going to have it smoke tested once I find a shop with a machine. Walked over the the one next door and theirs was out for repair. May change the turbo inlet while I'm in there if they find any of the seals leaking.

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subscribed for good info. Any ideas on a good DIY smoke tester? I don't have access to a lot of stores you guys do on the continental US but we do have small party city shops that sell smoke machines and amazon LOL. any of those have enough pressure to show smoke through the intake to show a leak?
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I bought an empty metal paint can at the hardware store and hooked up a couple of quick-connects to the lid. It doesn't hold much pressure, but you only need < 10psi to smoke test. Finding something to burn (for smoke) was the most challenging part. I ended up using an old cotton shirt drizzled with lighter fluid. Let it burn for 20-30 seconds before putting on the lid. Sealing the lid will put out the flames but you should get about a minute or so of smoke. I thought about using a smoke-bomb from a fireworks store, but something about that nasty smoke sounded like a really bad idea. Burning cotton probably isn't the best thing either, but at least it's natural and mostly chemical-free. Most important: it's cheap and easy. Edited by StkmltS
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^ Pretty much what he said. I would go with mineral oil vs the lighter fluid though.

 

I would like to find a larger can with a screw on top, as I've blown the top off my paint can a few times already.

 

Just for some visuals

 

http://www.r3vlimited.com/board/showthread.php?t=274418

 

 

Edit: STICKY THIS THREAD!

Edited by gimpydingo
STICKY
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Many types of fuel can be used in a smoker as long as they are natural and uncontaminated with harmful substances. These fuels include hessian, burlap, pine needles, corrugated cardboard, paper egg cartons, and rotten or punky wood. Some beekeeping supply sources also sell commercial fuels like pulped paper and compressed cotton.

 

The fuel in the smoker's burner smoulders slowly because there is only a small amount of oxygen inside, until a squeeze of the bellows provides a blast of fresh air. In this way the fuel is used more sparingly than in an open pan, and one load of fuel may last for several hours, or even days (if it is extinguished and rekindled again later). To calm the bees, the smoke must not be hot.

 

 

Burlap was the most common that I have heard of. Might be a good material for our smoke testers. I was using cotton shirt with mineral oil, works so-so.

Edited by gimpydingo
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The PSI or pressure I was referring to was to be able to throw the smoke into the system. This is for preassembled smoke machines for DJs and such. I prefer to have an all inclusive thing than a piece together thing since it's better on storage and when i need it you know? Further? I could buy a gallon of smoke and not use the whole thing in one sitting.

 

All of these suggestions are good ones though and have seen a few DIYs too.

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The preassembled won't have enough pressure to push through the system. I have one and it just has enough of a "fan" or whatever to get the smoke out of the front and fill a room. You need at least a couple of psi to get into the system. No home depot or lowes or similar around you?

 

I got a paint can for a few $$, hose/tip kit for my air compressor $6 and some epoxy $4. It will take maybe 20 - 30 min to make, just need to plan it out and make 2 holes (I did one on each side of the can, one low, one high) add the hose, epoxy and screw into the compressor.

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The preassembled won't have enough pressure to push through the system. I have one and it just has enough of a "fan" or whatever to get the smoke out of the front and fill a room. You need at least a couple of psi to get into the system. No home depot or lowes or similar around you?

 

I got a paint can for a few $$, hose/tip kit for my air compressor $6 and some epoxy $4. It will take maybe 20 - 30 min to make, just need to plan it out and make 2 holes (I did one on each side of the can, one low, one high) add the hose, epoxy and screw into the compressor.

I should have put the inlet and outlet in the side of the can like you did. Both being in the lid of my "machine" has me wondering how much air is going in and right back out without picking up much smoke or supplying the fire with enough oxygen to stay smoldering.

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