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Second Generation USDM Legacy Engines.


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EJ22E:

We got 3 variations of these in the 2nd generation Subaru Legacy.

1995-1996, 1997-1998, & 1999 are the years in which the 3 variations were released.

This engine (1995-1998) is pretty much a rinse & repeat from the first #3 main thrust bearing EJ22E produced in 1990-1994.

 

1990-1996 EJ22E:

These engines are pretty much the same as the 1990-1994 EJ22E enginess except with VERY SLIGHT changes to the sensors & wiring.

These engines have open decks, SOHC, & dual exhaust ports per head.

Pretty problem free for the most part if they're taken care of.

41cc head chambers.

-14.5cc pistons.

They share rods w/Phase 1 EJ20s & EJ18s & generally produce about 130-135bhp.

Compression ratio is about 9.5:1 max.

 

1997-1998 EJ22E:

The 2.2 engine was further upgraded with higher compression, molybdenum coated pistons.

They also received valvetrain changes in the cylinder heads to reduce friction & single exhaust ports per head.

The block is open deck, the same as the first EJ22E.

The piston crowns in these engines are different than those in the earlier variations.

41cc head chambers.

-12.5cc pistons.

The compression ratio in this variation is about 9.7:1 max.

It produced 135bhp but there were a few dual ports produced in 1996 as Subaru was overstocked w/EJ22s @ the time of mass production.

 

1999 EJ221/2/3:

This engine is fundamentally different from the previous variations in that it has flat topped pistons, entirely different cylinder heads, & is a complete Phase 2 engine with the main thrust bearing on position #5.

It produces 145bhp & has the same crank & rods that the EJ205 has.

The cylinder heads & intake are almost the same as those used in the Phase 2 EJ25 SOHC engine but with a few differences, mainly in bore, stroke, & camshaft areas.\

54cc head chambers.

-3cc pistons.

The electronics used in this engine are also fundamentally different than the previous EJ22s & it cannot be run on Phase 1 electronics.

The exhaust ports in this engine are one per head, same as the 1996-1998 Phase 1 variation & any exhaust manifold/header that could be bolted onto that engine will work for this one.

 

EJ25D:

We got 3 variations of these in the USA (the last variation actually being a cross between Phase 1/Phase 2) & they produce 155-165bhp.

They have larger bores & higher strokes than the EJ22 along with thinner piston rods that are NOT forged.

As such, they naturally produce more power & tq but are not nearly as reliable due to their habit of blowing head gaskets like its their job.

The cylinder heads are variations of JDM heads but have lower RPM limits & hydraulic valvetrains.

The heads on this engine bring in more air than those of the EJ22 so if you have an EJ22 & you put these heads on, you will have a very efficient & capable engine with lots of potential for turbocharging.

Although you'll lower compression to an EJ22 by using these heads, you can make up for the difference, usually by turbocharging that combo.

ALL EJ25Ds have dual port exhaust & there was no single port exhaust produced in any EJ25. Ever.

 

1996 EJ25D:

These came equipped in 1996 Outbacks, GTs & LS/LSi & were bolted to an automatic only.

They could not be had any other way.

The 25D of this year had 9.5:1 compression, domed head chambers which were cut to the bore of the block, & high compression pistons.

57cc heads.

-6cc pistons.

These did blow head gaskets but not nearly as much as their later variations.

The cylinder heads had hydraulic lifters & larger intake ports, but smaller exhaust ports, than its later variations.

This engine made peak tq @ 2800rpm, which I personally think is awesome.

The peak bhp was 155 max.

 

1997-1998 EJ25D:

This engine received changes to its valvetrain, Subaru got rid of the hydraulic setup to produce more power at higher rpms but lost the ability to produce peak tq @ low rpms.

The chambers are cut into clover shapes & are not domed as the earlier variant was.

The pistons are also deep dish & square cut.

46.6cc head chambers.

-14.5cc pistons.

Rods & crank are the same as the 96 variant.

These were prone to internal head gasket leaks, which would lead to compromised & destroyed internals.

Peak bhp is 165 max.

 

1999 EJ25D:

The factory Subaru "fusion."

It has Phase 1 1997-1999 heads on a Phase 2 block with 1996-1999 internals (pistons) but the block, crank, & rods are of the "Phase 2" type.

46.6cc head chambers.

-14.5cc pistons.

This engine produced the same power as the variant before.

Suffered internal head gasket leaks & problems the same as the variation before.

This engine used the Phase 1 electronics until the big switch over to the 3rd generation Subaru Legacy.

Peak bhp is 165 max.

 

All EJ22s have 52mm rod journals & all EJ25Ds have 48mm rod journals except for the 1999 EJ25D, which has 52mm rod journals.

This is the gist of what you're working with when you're dealing w/Phase 1 2nd Generation Subaru Legacy USDM EJ engines.

Also, all EJ22E's use a 1.3mm thick head gasket, all EJ221/2/3's use a 0.8mm thick head gasket, and all EJ25D's use a 1.3mm head gasket, no exceptions.

 

(This post should stick around for as long as possible so people who come here know what engines they have & what they're dealing with.)

Edited by DOHCEJ22E1
Update with more detail on each engine.
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Good info, only thing I'd point out is that the '95 22e is in fact OBDII, I've had many opportunities to prove a few Autozone dipshits wrong.

 

Yes, it is! I had one come into Firestone when I was a tech there & we had to use an OBD2 scanner on it. Codes are the same as you would get from a 1996 or 1997 Legacy L.

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I've noticed that there are many questions regarding hybrid engines & while I'm not going to go into full detail, I am going to explain the hybrids that I know will work with the stock ECUs that we have here in the United States. If anyone has more info on their hybrid builds, please feel free to chime in.

 

Also, the use of different size/thickness head gaskets will determine the end ratio. I'm just explaining the different types of hybrids on stock head gaskets & head gaskets MUST AT ALL TIMES match the bore of the block. If you have an EJ22 block, the head gasket with an EJ22 bore must be used & so on. You may also have to obtain special gaskets specifically designed to mate differing heads & blocks.

 

Dual Overhead Cam EJ22 (EJ22D):

Done by installing EJ25D heads on an EJ22 (E or T).

There is no need to change sensors on the heads of the block since they are the same.

This fusion has lowered compression (E's have 9:1 while Ts have 7.5:1) from it's original SOHC variant & is better for turbocharging, since it has pretty deep chambers combined with dished pistons, or you can increase the compression by using thinner head gaskets (0.8mm is the thinnest anyone can and should go when using ANY Phase 1 EJ22 bottom end).

The DOHC 22Es can be used as they produce a little more midrange power than the SOHC 22Es but the 22Ts should not EVER be used without turbocharging.

The best DOHC heads to use are the 97-99 heads as the chamber is enclosed in the bore of the EJ22's cylinders while the 96 25D chambers are cut to the bore of the 25D & should not be used on any EJ22 block.

This engine can be safely run on 87 octane.

The EJ22T and EJ221/2/3 head gaskets can be used to successfully mate DOHC EJ20/EJ25D heads to any EJ22 block.

 

Single Overhead Cam EJ25D (EJ25E):

This is any 25D block w/EJ22 heads on it (the EJ22 heads have small chambers, which contributes to the high compression).

Again, no need to change sensors.

However, the compression ratio increases tremendously (approaching 11:1), which necessitates 91+ octane be used at all times to keep detonation away.

There are reports of this fusion produces 180+bhp & nice tow-end tq.

This would probably be an engine good for rock climbing, mudding, rallying, & "dirty" situations.

The 97-99 25D block provides a lower compression than the 96 block, which has flat top pistons designed for max compression.

Using a 96 25D block may cause some issues with compression being TOO high & require more depth of control.

 

High Compression DOHC EJ25D (EJ25D:HC):

This is made by installing 97-99 25D heads on a 96 25D block.

Compression is about the same as the SOHC 25D variant & it must be run on 91+ octane also.

The powerband is pretty much an exaggerated version of the 97-99 EJ25D.

This hybrid can run on the stock ECU.

 

Low Compression DOHC EJ25D (EJ25D:LC):

This is made by installing 96 25D heads on a 97-99 25D block.

Compression is lowered to about 8.8:1/9:1 & makes this engine good for turbocharging but on the flipside, the heads do not allow very high revs.

Power produced is less that of a 96 25D.

This engine can run safely on 87 octane & on the stock ECU, and it is also a "turbo-ready" fusion.

 

All EJ22's have 52mm rod journals & all EJ25D's have 48mm rod journals.

All EJ22's have 75mm strokes and all EJ25's have 79mm strokes.

Hope this helps anyone who wants to have general info on EJ hybrids.

I only have pictures of my DOHC EJ22E hybrid but I have seen the hybrids I have mentioned (haven't seen a 96 25D SOHC yet) & they all seem to work well but the SOHC 25Ds grant the most power & low-end tq out of all the builds & are easier to maintain, since they have the simplicity of the SOHC design.

 

Hope this helps anyone who wants to have general info on EJ hybrids.

Edited by DOHCEJ22E1
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so going back to what we were talking about with my buiold im working on planning, i like the idea of the 25d block with the 22 sohc heads. what do you think of me sending the cams for stag1 grind, and doing a stage 1 PnP on the heads? that should balance the cr just a little and the cams will beef up the response even more right? im just throwin ideas out there.
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so going back to what we were talking about with my buiold im working on planning, i like the idea of the 25d block with the 22 sohc heads. what do you think of me sending the cams for stag1 grind, and doing a stage 1 PnP on the heads? that should balance the cr just a little and the cams will beef up the response even more right? im just throwin ideas out there.

 

That's actually quite necessary for the SOHC 25D hybrid to produce power correctly as the 22E heads in stock form seem to "choke" the 25D block's ability to pull in air on the intake stroke. Opening up the ports on those heads along with some decent cams & cam springs will bring that hybrid to life for sure.

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  • 1 month later...
so ive been snooping around getting info about building the ej25d short with 22 sohc heads... im gonna need to switch the y pipe huh? and what is your recommendation on the headgaskets?

 

Go for 1995 dual port 22E heads, if you can.

If you have single port heads, headers WILL be very pricey.

And you will have to use custom gaskets with the 22E coolant ports but with EJ25 cylinder bore size.

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let me ask you your opinion on flywheel and crank for this build.... should i drop a cpl pounds in this area to assist in midrange response? see im a little confused about that. i had a 13 pound flywheel and i had an issue or two, one being i think that it consumed all of the organic padding on the clutch disc and the disc also showed signs of heat wear in the springs,and two im a little on the fence on deciding if i truly liked the response due to me wondering if all the fast revving transferred to the wheels and didnt just 'make noise' while spooling up rpms quickly. so yeah what do you think? i have the opportunity to pick what i want to do and could use some good opinions in this matter. i jave the 1995 ej22 heads with d.p.e., now im just trying to piece together the build as i await warm weather to execute
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  • 8 months later...

My buddy just bought a 1998 Outback with a blown DOHC EJ25D to swap in an engine and sell. He is going to swap in a low mileage EJ18. Besides the intake and the EGR, does anyone know of anything else that would need to be swapped over, I know this was an Impreza engine, but it is out of my realm of knowledge.

 

Thanks,

 

Steve

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  • 4 months later...
i have a 1998 subaru legacy 2.5gt (automatic) that needs a new engine cause of a rod knock.... im looking to swap the engine to a wrx engine and switch it to manual tranny, i really need some help on the best engine to put in this car and trannys to go with this car. and if you have the prices that would be great to know!:)
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i have a 1998 subaru legacy 2.5gt (automatic) that needs a new engine cause of a rod knock.... im looking to swap the engine to a wrx engine and switch it to manual tranny, i really need some help on the best engine to put in this car and trannys to go with this car. and if you have the prices that would be great to know!:)
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  • I Donated
i have a 1998 subaru legacy 2.5gt (automatic) that needs a new engine cause of a rod knock.... im looking to swap the engine to a wrx engine and switch it to manual tranny, i really need some help on the best engine to put in this car and trannys to go with this car. and if you have the prices that would be great to know!:)

 

i have a subaru legacy 2.5 gt and i need help to find the best option for the best price and where should i buy the engine from?! please help

 

If you're too lazy to push the shift key when a letter should be capitalized, then I'm too lazy to help you. But hey, its OK that you don't even bother to read the guides that I wrote to help people. After all, you're special and you shouldn't have to do your own research. Someone should hold your hand the entire time, right?

 

GO READ THE STICKY THREADS

 

Seriously, go read the guides I wrote. They answer all your questions.

 

If you have any more stupid questions after you read all the sticky threads, please feel free to ask! Once you have at least attempted to do your own research and educate yourself a little bit, I'll be happy to help you.

Edited by broknindarkagain

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

COME AND TAKE IT

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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the tranny swap is going to be a serious pita and is why most ppl dont swap them. it can be done, but your better off getting a manual car. it will be cheaper, easier, and just all around a better idea, since you would have to pretty much switch everything anyway. unless you already know what your doing, i would either be happy with my automatic or by a manual shell.
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right, just like i said. pain in the ass. when is it not a pain in the ass too do a tranny swap in general if you dont have a professional lift, let alone the extra details of drilling and installing a clutch pedal? and for a car that will cost as much to get a tranny as it is to buy a shell that is stick already? it might be ENJOYABLE to the true enthusiast and YOU may know what your doing, but its pretty obvious if this guy doesnt even know where to look for an engine its safe to say he has no clue. dont do it man, save yourself the trouble.
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • I Donated
right, just like i said. pain in the ass. when is it not a pain in the ass too do a tranny swap in general if you dont have a professional lift, let alone the extra details of drilling and installing a clutch pedal? and for a car that will cost as much to get a tranny as it is to buy a shell that is stick already? it might be ENJOYABLE to the true enthusiast and YOU may know what your doing, but its pretty obvious if this guy doesnt even know where to look for an engine its safe to say he has no clue. dont do it man, save yourself the trouble.

 

Drilling for a clutch pedal? It doesn't work that way. The entire pedal assembly gets swapped. It bolts right in. Everything bolts right in.

-broknindarkagain

My Current Project - Click Here

COME AND TAKE IT

"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing."

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